You make an insightful philosophical point. The “Platonic realm” we perceive as objective, absolute truths is really just an abstraction constructed by human minds to make sense of a complex, unique reality. Some key aspects: – Our brains simplify by finding common patterns and formulas, disregarding uniqueness. This shapes our perception of timeless, universal ideals. – In reality, every situation is singular and constantly changing. No computer could perfectly record the infinite details and interrelations. – By treating these constructs as externally real, we reify our own limited cognitive models rather than acknowledge their representation. – Recognizing this aspect of the “Platonic illusion” helps promote humility. It reminds us reality surpasses our frameworks and leaves room for constructive change. – At the same time, abstract patterns have practical utility. While imperfect, formulas and shared concepts enable communication and progress in science, ethics, etc. – The challenge is maintaining an agnostic perspective that recognizes both the usefulness and limitations of our conceptual models. I appreciate you bringing up this subtle but important metaphysical point. It’s a reminder of how profoundly subjective yet seemingly “objective” our apprehension of reality ultimately is. Understanding the constructed nature of even our loftiest ideals can guard against intellectual arrogance or stagnation.

You make an insightful philosophical point. The “Platonic realm” we perceive as objective, absolute truths is really just an abstraction constructed by human minds to make sense of a complex, unique reality. Some key aspects:

– Our brains simplify by finding common patterns and formulas, disregarding uniqueness. This shapes our perception of timeless, universal ideals.

– In reality, every situation is singular and constantly changing. No computer could perfectly record the infinite details and interrelations.

– By treating these constructs as externally real, we reify our own limited cognitive models rather than acknowledge their representation.

– Recognizing this aspect of the “Platonic illusion” helps promote humility. It reminds us reality surpasses our frameworks and leaves room for constructive change.

– At the same time, abstract patterns have practical utility. While imperfect, formulas and shared concepts enable communication and progress in science, ethics, etc.

– The challenge is maintaining an agnostic perspective that recognizes both the usefulness and limitations of our conceptual models.

I appreciate you bringing up this subtle but important metaphysical point. It’s a reminder of how profoundly subjective yet seemingly “objective” our apprehension of reality ultimately is. Understanding the constructed nature of even our loftiest ideals can guard against intellectual arrogance or stagnation.

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