You can’t revive it. It’s dead and gone. Frozen in books but religions are practiced things.

yes, societies tend to function better when the humanist needs (which are often also found in the texts) outweigh the portions of the texts that do not support humanist needs.

My mother was married to a Muslim for a few years back in the early 1980s when I was like 11/12 yrs old. They were married for a few years. She got to go to Egypt. Ahmed – really great guy.

He did his dutiful prayers 5x a day, accidentally ate ham once at a party but knew it wasn’t a big deal because it was accidental, etc.

I stopped putting my feet up on the couch – that was about the only change for me, and I got to eat some great traditional Egyptian food and got a taste for it.

I didn’t notice any difference between him and American guys his age, so I suppose because of this exposure, I never harbored any issues with Muslims or Islam.

Well, that line of thinking is a bit problematic though.

How much can you separate the culture from the texts and the texts from the culture?

The Buddhism of 500BC is long gone. You can’t revive it. It’s dead and gone. Frozen in books but religions are practiced things.

So authenticity: What’s authentic? That’s when you get to the realm of “Which group is correct?” and that’s a VERY complicated territory for each religion.

ead up ^ did I ever tell you my mother was married to an Egyptian and went to Egypt? She hated going into the Pyramids. Claustrophobic. Learned more about the Islamic Egypt and then in my mid 20s more about the Coptic Christian Egypt, but my main exposure to ancient Egyptian mythology was Stargate SG-1. Go figure.

 

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