YES! They broke the 7nm barrier – *and* they’re doing it in “3D” (stacking). [back in Jun 2017 but I’m behind on the news] Knew it! Been waiting for this change for a long time. I hope it pans out well. I don’t know how high they’ll be able to stack but to be able to successfully pile transistors of that scale on top of each other without running into quantum effects means the potential for amazing things to come. While we have a long way to go yet, I love this advancement.

YES! They broke the 7nm barrier – *and* they’re doing it in “3D” (stacking). [back in Jun 2017 but I’m behind on the news]

Knew it! Been waiting for this change for a long time. I hope it pans out well. I don’t know how high they’ll be able to stack but to be able to successfully pile transistors of that scale on top of each other without running into quantum effects means the potential for amazing things to come.

While we have a long way to go yet, I love this advancement.

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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cyxtgWbIwyE Tripling battery life alone will be a huge boost. We will take it for granted but what I see in better batteries is that it could help reduce our reliance on generating power as we’d be able to use longer trickle charging methods and the stored energy will useful to take with.

Oh I totally agree! Our programming mindsets tend to a single thread of “if this, then that” and most languages that *do* support concurrency do so as an “add on feature” rather than built-into the language itself.

One great example of a language built with concurrency is Erlang. Each process doesn’t interact with the others directly but instead passes messages to each other. If one thread dies, it doesn’t take down the others.

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I haven’t found the magical language that solves my problems yet :) What I liked when I looked into Erlang though is its origins. If I remember right, it was created for Erikson phones back in the early 1990s. it was designed as a telephony programming language so concurrency was built into everything.

I like how it’s tied so strongly to the hardware and its processes itself.

Most programming though has gotten more and more abstract, far far away from the equipment being used. That’s been great in a lot of ways: lots of advancements have been made by not tying down programs to specific hardware platforms, but the cost is LAYERS and layers and layers of inbetween stuff.

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