Yes – sounds akin to object oriented programming or genetic inheritance models (or “global scoping” variables vs local scope in programming)…

Yes – sounds akin to object oriented programming or genetic inheritance models (or “global scoping” variables vs local scope in programming)…

It sounds like the language _generally_ evaluates from left to right, but with proper bracketing/parenthesis, the evaluation can go in both directions or even from right to left, so long as you are following the logic properly.

Considering that this is akin to a function, it _can_ be considered as being evaluated “all at once” but realistically, we do things stepwise, so it’s definitely possible for something at the far end of a logic chain (equivalent to a function or perhaps a subroutine in programming) to affect an element or set or some kind of transformation that occurs in the beginning – or, in fact, ANYWHERE within it. Quite powerful stuff. They’re ALMOST algorithms. Really nice. Perhaps they are algorithms…

..wait yes, of COURSE they’re algorithms… lol functions procedures and algorithms are generally interchangeable terms… I was just getting caught up in programming-specific distinctions which work out ‘functionally’ to be the same idea  :P

referring to:
Once a variable is bound by a quatifier the parens control the scope of that binding and all uses of that variable are all the same quantification.

This language is very handy for expressing mathematical truths. For example, for all x there exists a y, where x and y are integers, such that x times y equals x. This defines the multiplicative identity one. The expression, “x times y equals x” is a predicate. Once bound to values, it has a truth value of either true or false. So with x=2 and y=2, it is false. But with y=1, all instances of x drawn from integers make it true proving the statement.“

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