Yes. Sleepwalking is a combined state of both sleep *and* wakefulness. It’s a low wakefulness and a high sleep but there’s still wakefulness there.

There’s some choice but it’s a “drugged choice”. Much of what we do is habitual but not entirely automatic. Most “programs” can be interrupted by the user or someone else. But like inertia, they tend to continue in the direction that start or stay stopped when stopped.

Yes. Sleepwalking is a combined state of both sleep *and* wakefulness. It’s a low wakefulness and a high sleep but there’s still wakefulness there.

Our conscious choices are also a combination. How “woke” are you at any given moment?

If the weather is overcast, you’re awake but sleepy. If you’ve been driving a while and the road hypnotizes you, you’re awake but distracted by the rhythmic pattern.

Music can put people into a state of combined wakefulness and ‘other states’. Call it partial sleepiness. Call it hypnotized. I’d called it a slightly “drugged” state where something that ‘grabs ahold’ of the subconscious is causing the subconscious to somewhat assert itself.

I once had a nice diagram of the prefrontal cortex and amygdala which shows the amount of “signal” goes in either direction. It’s bi-directional yes, but it’s not a fair or even distribution.

[the amygdala of course is not the WHOLE of subconsciousness just as the prefrontal cortex isn’t the WHOLE of wakeful consciousness but they’re significant]

It shows a wider bandwidth (a physically wider ‘tube’ going from the amygdala to the prefrontal cortex, whereas the corresponding prefrontal cortex to the amygdala ‘tube’ is much more narrow and the electrochemical signals going down these physical pathways) transfer at a much slower rate of speed.

It’s possible to improve it through work but it takes ongoing retraining.

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