Yes, but anti-authority is built into the American psyche. US revolution, breaking away from England, revolting against their authority. At least in WORDS. lots of WORDS about liberty/freedom/etc. In deeds? We learn from a young age to follow authority but because of the 1st amendment, we’re allowed to complain. Just not to do anything about it.

Yes, but anti-authority is built into the American psyche. US revolution, breaking away from England, revolting against their authority.
At least in WORDS. lots of WORDS about liberty/freedom/etc.
In deeds? We learn from a young age to follow authority but because of the 1st amendment, we’re allowed to complain. Just not to do anything about it.
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t’s taught in school. That doesn’t make it popular. It’s forced reading.
I also had to read Huckleberry Finn which was about a boy befriending a black slave as they run away from authorities.
“rebel”. But in the end, he just wants a family and goes back to that. Or independence. I don’t remember which.
The messages america tells to americans is pretty consistently the same and somewhat ridiculous. Mostly you can do anything you want so long as you have money and if you have money, nobody can tell you what to do. That’s pretty much America’s morality system in a nutshell.
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 Newer stories that are assigned reading might have a little more impact. My older nieces had “Holes” assigned which also became a movie:

Teenagers are forced to go to a prison camp to dig holes under extremely illegal conditions.

In the end, they escape and find their families who were looking for them.

The message is: Sometimes you have to work hard and it sucks and there’s nothing you can do about it.
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It’s part of the national character. How does it get spread? parents to kids. churches. neighborhood values as they play with the other kids.
School is seen as a chore to get through. So is work. Few get actual fulfillment from either school or work. They are just things to do and your real life is outside of those constructs.
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Some of it? Sure.
But I think the only time school indoctrination is successful in the USA is when it’s reinforced strictly by the adults in the community, where all of the parents consciously work together to instill the same values as the school – or rather the school instills the same values as the parents.
You’ll find this in very small communities, usually with sports teams. Same parents with the same kids on the sports teams. Then they’re all in church together on Sunday in the same religion. And they go to the same schools together.
So it only works well in that kind of highly consistent environment — which I find creepy – but i know places like that exist.
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In America, a kid is kicked out of the house at 5 years old. Sink or swim, they have to socialize.
There’s schoolwork and homework — lots and lots of homework – for the 12 year school career.
Lessons are generally structured but the majority of the trouble kids have isn’t with schoolwork.
It’s SOCIALIZATION with other students.
That’s where most of the learning takes place, for better or worse.
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