yes, and we an control the timing of even the thinking processes itself. I was looking at lock stich mechanism. It fascinates me because it does what seems topologically impossible. But it works because the bobbin is NOT a part of the machine. It is free. It works WITH the sewing machine itself but the bobbin spins freely. So, that is one aspect of free; unattached. Yet, our wills are free in even more ways than the bobbin. Timing is one of them. Now a bobbin spins freely but as long as its thread travels together with the sewing machine thread, its fate – to become part of the lock stitch – is set. But if the thread breaks, the connection is broken and yet does not affect the machine at all, just the result. So a bobbin’s timing is tied to whether it is traveling with the sewing machine thread or not. Yet, we have sophisticated timings. Some of them are out of our hands; certain ranges are set by genetics, many more by society’s demands and our training as children; but inbetween that, there’s a ranging of timing that we can choose freely. Some complain that because we cannot break the laws of physics, we can’t have a truly free will. But that’s an absurd definition of “free will”; some things are givens and that’s ok. Is it true that our range of choices in any given moment may not be infinite and in fact may be restricted in scope? Probably. But these natural limitations include such things as the realization of our restrictions and our natural limitations include our abilities to imagine the infinite, to create amazing things – even the freedom to deny just how amazing it all is if one choses. And also, one can chose to be amazed that it’s even possible at all; that our bobbins can spin freely even while being useful to multiple purposes as well. We choose continually; maybe not all people can choose the same way or about the same things or in the same amounts; yet from what which can choose, we can.

yes, and we an control the timing of even the thinking processes itself.

I was looking at lock stich mechanism. It fascinates me because it does what seems topologically impossible.

But it works because the bobbin is NOT a part of the machine. It is free. It works WITH the sewing machine itself but the bobbin spins freely.

So, that is one aspect of free; unattached.

Yet, our wills are free in even more ways than the bobbin. Timing is one of them. Now a bobbin spins freely but as long as its thread travels together with the sewing machine thread, its fate – to become part of the lock stitch – is set. But if the thread breaks, the connection is broken and yet does not affect the machine at all, just the result.

So a bobbin’s timing is tied to whether it is traveling with the sewing machine thread or not.

Yet, we have sophisticated timings. Some of them are out of our hands; certain ranges are set by genetics, many more by society’s demands and our training as children; but inbetween that, there’s a ranging of timing that we can choose freely.

Some complain that because we cannot break the laws of physics, we can’t have a truly free will. But that’s an absurd definition of “free will”; some things are givens and that’s ok.

Is it true that our range of choices in any given moment may not be infinite and in fact may be restricted in scope? Probably. But these natural limitations include such things as the realization of our restrictions and our natural limitations include our abilities to imagine the infinite, to create amazing things – even the freedom to deny just how amazing it all is if one choses.

And also, one can chose to be amazed that it’s even possible at all; that our bobbins can spin freely even while being useful to multiple purposes as well. We choose continually; maybe not all people can choose the same way or about the same things or in the same amounts; yet from what which can choose, we can.

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