Yes, and that is something I believe in. But I’ve encountered, as I’m sure you have, English-only activism and along with it comes a lot of unneccessary and what I think of as unAmerican notions.

Yes, and that is something I believe in.

But I’ve encountered, as I’m sure you have, English-only activism and along with it comes a lot of unneccessary and what I think of as unAmerican notions.

====

It’s not fear but free speech.

English-only is anti-first amendment.

——

That’s why it’s unAmerican.
—-
 I’ll admit to having a strong bias in our discussion that I didn’t realize until an hour ago or so.You’ve said that you’re from another country and came to America.

A common American bias – one that I fell into – is this:

When somebody did not grow up in the USA but immigrated tells those who were born and raised here that they know the USA better than those born within its boundaries, it gets the heckles of the average American up.

“I know you better than you know yourselves”. And that can sometimes be true. But when you are raised with the unique set of prejudices and assumptions that come along with growing up within boundaries, it grants a deeper understanding, much of which is hard to articulate.

So for me, to hear America is homogenous nation that speaks English, I don’t see it from a European POV but from an American POV.

In an American POV, talk of English is the language of the USA harkens to unAmerican anti-free speech efforts to make English the official language, banning bi-lingualism, and evicting those who do not learn to speak it within a limited grace period.

That’s why my heckles went up.

=====
 I know that wasn’t your intention -but that’s why I could not see what you really were leaning towards.

Local areas have tried to ban bilingual speaking / writing in the USA and it’s frightening.

=====

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


four + 7 =

Leave a Reply