WST-2010 ARTIFACTS CHAPTER 11+12 – CLAUDE AI

WST-2010 ARTIFACTS CHAPTER 11+12 – CLAUDE AI

Unfortunately I do not have access to the full text of “Gender and the Military” to provide a comprehensive list of artifacts and their descriptions. However, based on the sections included, some examples of artifacts discussed and how they could be described academically are:

– Military recruitment posters (Fig 12.1) – The original 1999 poster shows a female marine drill sergeant with the text “We never promised you a rose garden.” The unofficial modified version shows the same image but with changed text reading “We don’t promise you a rose garden either.” It could be described as a visual text demonstrating evolving attitudes towards women’s military roles.

– Photograph of Kristin Beck (Fig 12.2) – This 2013 news photograph shows Beck, a transgender former Navy Seal, after transitioning to female. It reflects changing policies and experiences of transgender people in the military.

– “We Cannot Live without Our Lives” protest banner (Fig 12.4) – This banner was carried at a 1979 protest over murdered black women in Boston. It represents material culture related to African American women’s activism around issues of violence and policing.

– Photograph of Margaret Witt’s wedding (Fig 12.3) – This 2012 news photograph shows Major Witt marrying her female partner after her military discharge under “Don’t Ask Don’t Tell” was reversed. It represents the experiences of gay and lesbian service members.

– Excerpts from Department of Defense report on Tailhook ’91 – These official government documents provide textual evidence of sexual assault in the military and the institutional response.

– Children’s book review of Hero Mom – This 2013 book review discusses a text aimed at military children with mothers serving abroad, reflecting changing demographics of parenthood in the armed forces.

More examples could likely be drawn from additional sections not included here. The key is providing enough context and description for the reader to understand the type, origin, date, and significance of each artifact as evidence.

[responsivevoice_button voice="US English Male"]

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


× six = 18

Leave a Reply