whiteness / anti-whiteness is 100% US born and raised. Sometimes European is used as a substitute for whiteness in the US and Canada but that’s different from a European identity in Europe. Example: Once upon a time, people would identify as being from a particular country. “I’m 1/2 German / 1/2 Irish”. “I’m 1/4 Ukrainian, 1/2 Slovak, 1/4 Scottish”. That sort of thing. But that’s too darned complicated for some folks, so it’s just “whiteness” or “Western Civilization” or “Greco-Roman roots’ and a dozen other substitutes for some collectivist notion of loose affiliations. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnic_groups_in_Europe

whiteness / anti-whiteness is 100% US born and raised.
Sometimes European is used as a substitute for whiteness in the US and Canada but that’s different from a European identity in Europe.

Example: Once upon a time, people would identify as being from a particular country. “I’m 1/2 German / 1/2 Irish”. “I’m 1/4 Ukrainian, 1/2 Slovak, 1/4 Scottish”. That sort of thing.

But that’s too darned complicated for some folks, so it’s just “whiteness” or “Western Civilization” or “Greco-Roman roots’ and a dozen other substitutes for some collectivist notion of loose affiliations.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ethnic_groups_in_Europe

One of the aspects of whiteness is “white-as-default”. You can see it in Google search. It’s reflected in language and how we use it.

White people don’t usually search for “white people”. White people search for “people” and expect (unconsciously) to get white people and they usually get white people.

Watch how it reads when I take out the “white”:

People don’t usually search for “white people”. People search for “people” and expect (unconsciously) to get people and they usually get people.

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A similar example that you’ve seen yourself and I do it:

“Everybody on the internet is from the United States”.

This is a US assumption and a hard one to break. I’ve assumed you were from the US once, never once even thinking you might be from anywhere else.

The US-centric nature of how people in the US tend to communicate online isn’t as insidious as whiteness in American culture but it’s still there.

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Exactly – and these discussions are necessary because the previous attempt has failed.

Previously, “if you don’t talk about it, it goes away”.

Turned out that didn’t work.

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An example of the previous attempt: It helped somewhat. The mantra of many became “I don’t see color”. But it didn’t work all the way. In fact, it made _some_ things worse, where substitute words began to replace prejudicial words and the “default audience” didn’t notice the problem for decades.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZBJXtTIbDTo

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