While I don’t think it’s what Larry meant, it’s surprising how many questions just need their words moved around a little and a period at the end in order to get a valid answer.

While I don’t think it’s what Larry meant, it’s surprising how many questions just need their words moved around a little and a period at the end in order to get a valid answer.

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I went through his audio tapes in the mid 90s. I forget which ones but it was about a dozen cassettes. Listened to them all. Good stuff, especially when you need a really good esteem boost, need your head cleared, and your mind refocused on what you “can” rather than what you “can’t”… future oriented rather than past and stuff.

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His segment on “Ask” then “Ask specifically” probably stuck with me the longest… a good 20 years later.

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Once I went through the tapes, I never listened to them again. Didn’t have to. There’s probably a dozen or so NLP style motivational speakers that are similar. What’s nice about ones that are good (assuming that they have similar qualities to Tony Robbins – all evidence anecdotal, as is this), is that you feel a confidence where you don’t need to prove it to anybody. You *know* you’re good. Doesn’t matter what kind of good. You just know it.

Does everybody need it? I dunno. I don’t even know if *I* needed it. But I’m glad I did it. That’s about all I can tell you.

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I’d say there’s no wrong questions. There may be more effective and less effective questions, but not “right or wrong”.

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It’s on a scale. Right and Wrong implies 0 or 1. But how many possible formulations are there of a question?

Two?

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Then already you have more than two buckets to place questions into. Each right portion of context makes it “more effective”. Each right portion of criteria makes it “more effective”.

It’s always on a scale.

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You’re guessing. Also, you’re wrong. This is ok, because you didn’t ask a question.

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Question: Is the right question the same as the expected question?

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The only way I can see there being “right questions” and “wrong questions” is if there is a guessing game going on of some sort

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I’ll change direction:

Who determines when the question is the right question? Is there a sky accounting system somewhere to determine what a right question is?

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Yes, there is right and wrong with questions when there is a guessing game, such as, “Guess what question I expect you to ask? When you guess the right question, you win!”

That context, you are correct.

What are other contexts in which you are correct?

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That’s fine. Then it is not a wrong question. It is an invalid question, an inappropriate question, a fallacious question.

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Everybody else is doing it so it’s ok here to? Simply saying “wrong question” is useless information. But saying invalid, inappropriate or fallacious is useful information.

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It’s more useful to say “invalid / inappropriate / fallacious question” than it is to say “wrong question”.

Its not wrong to say “wrong question”, just less effective.

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It may seem nitpicky but really, it’s not. Clarity in communication is difficult as obscurity happens without any human effort. Shannon has stuff to say about that in the late 40s. Good stuff btw.

But I suppose it depends upon your end goals. Communication clarity is one of mine. Might not be yours, might be, might be irrelevant.

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