What’s it like to have an idea for 40+ years, watch various people and companies fork off of your ideas

What’s it like to have an idea for 40+ years, watch various people and companies fork off of your ideas, implementing lesser variations of your grand plan with the lesser plans taking the world by storm.. and suffering the consequences you foresaw decades prior to its implementation?
 
You’d have Ted Nelson (Theodor Nelson) and he’s never stopped working on his vision. Here he is a few months ago.
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Here’s the genius guy – and he’s still working on it. While Tim Berners Lee gets the credit for the www…. as Ted points out here… the www is just a fork off of his his idea – and a poor one because its one way.
 Here’s the genius guy – and he’s still working on it. While Tim Berners Lee gets the credit for the www…. as Ted points out here… the www is just a fork off of his his idea – and a poor one because its one way.
I’m not a fan of intellectual property either. I understand it’s a reality of the world but I’m not a fan. That said, his is certainly a more practical solution all around but really, I don’t know if I’d *want* to depend on “single source” copies of things. [of course caching would take care of that but I actually like the crazy redundancy and remixing of the web as it is.One that has more of my attention one of the other geniuses of that era… Vern… hm, forgot his last name suddenly. His push is for “digital parchment” and his concern mirrors mine : the loss of information on the web as a loss of a generation of history.
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 https://cacm.acm.org/magazines/2016/10/207755-were-going-backward/fulltext
Vint Cerf – his name is magical to me. Here’s one of his many writeups on disappearing information. I was so happy to see that a big guy like him is on the case : I’ve been watching information disappear for years online and it’s been bothering me for a long time, so I save what’s important to me somewhere.
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  Thing is though, our loss of memory (whether collective, individual, internet, libraries getting rid of less popular books), isn’t *necessarily* the “less significant details” that get lost.That’s my concern.We assume / hope that what’s lost wasn’t important anyway… but sometimes it was important and we just moved on, blindly, re-encountering old problems long ago solved because of our rush forward and continual past erasures.
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  I’m thinking from an archivist point of view.What’s important to an archivist point of view? Everything. That’s what’s hard. Consider: Who is it that allows for information to be presented that a person can use to decide significance from?”Here’s A B C. What’s significant?”Somebody has to have A B C available for the choice to be made from. And a drawer with D E F as well.
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  I like maximal. For perspectives, I like as many views as possible. As many angles from the outside, from the inside looking out, both ways, split into parts, combined with other larger things, usages, re-usages, abstracted and moved into other contexts… and the ability to have access to as much of that as is possible at a whim.Is it possible to capture everything? Nope. But we can do a lot better. I’m not talking about taking away peoples’ privacy or anything like that. But rather, I consider the internet-as-failing-library. The memory of the internet is very short, even as google search results often seem stuck in 2013. But google lost its magic a few years ago when they started playing favorites. Yet, who is replacing?Now there’s apps. Apps are awesome. But what happens when a service for an app shuts down? Information loss. Happened to me. Vine shut down mid January 2017. I made about 15,000 videos. Thankfully I backed most of them up in a few different ways because what happened a few weeks later? Suddenly hyperlinks to my videos were dead.. 3+ years of history is now swiss-cheesed, with spotty availability.I was prepared though even when the service was at its peak. Archived 10,000 of them on internet archive last year and Coub came along and wrote a script to pull in vines into their service for people that chose to, which I did.
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  They normalize trauma by not caring the moment next quarter profitability can’t be predicted. Speed of business has little to do with customers or the datasets but about bottom line. That’s just how they are.Blockchain has promise but it’s too immature for me to give it my trust yet. That said, I haven’t researched it deeply as I’m skeptical about its long term prospects.
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  I’m a huge fan of internet archive. They need more mirrors. I believe they have three or four large mirrors and a bunch of partial mirrors but being non-profit, their dedication is true.Paper is still the ultimate backup (next to stone). I briefly thought once of making a little “flip book video” service where I’d take people’s vines and have them printed in little 300 page flipbooks but I’d need to encode the audio in flippable paper somehow so decided against it. But I get ideas like that a lot.
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  When I shut down my minecraft server in 2014, I promised the users I’d save their stuff. I still have it. An idea I’ve tossed around is getting a 3D printer one day, printing out their creations, finding them (which would be a feat because I never asked for identifying information so it’d have to be voluntary), and mailing their creations to them.Pipe dreams. But I like figuring out the processes so that I know what’s possible.
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While there’s been a lot of activity in it, one issue I have is that it seems to be redistributing a limited amount of currency that then gets redistributed in the system. It seems that gaining currency requires convincing other people to sacrifice their currency to invest, with a vast majority of people not contributing fresh currency into the system but rather hoping to acquire those of others.
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  It’s a wholly object oriented system though isn’t it?
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  I don’t mean the software, I mean the conceptualization and execution.
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  I haven’t been following its history or forking but there’s inherent (pun intended) flaws in all wholly object oriented systems.
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  As long as everybody using the object oriented systems *think* in object oriented terms, everything works great. But once somebody who thinks from an agent or even a procedural POV – or just human POV – some kind of sideways – the vulnerabilities will be found.
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  I don’t know about the situation you’re referring to – but by context I’m gathering that there was a big problem with it, or one of its predecessors who were using the system not as intended?
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  I just took a quick glance at it : seems security revolves around some scrambling using higher base math conversions that are programmable but difficult to decrypt while in route?

The type system in Solidity revolves largely around the 256-bit word size of the EVM. To this end, there are 4 major types, each of which are specifically 256-bits wide:
uint: 256-bit unsigned integer, operable with bitwise and unsigned arithmetic operations.
int: 256-bit signed integer, operable with bitwise and signed arithmetic operations.
real: 256-bit signed fixed-point quantity, 127-bit left of the point, 128-bit right.
bytes32: sequence of 32 bytes (256 bit in total).In addition to these, there is the intrinsic address type used for identifying specific accounts and a bool type for representing true and false:

address: account identifier, 160-bits.
bool: two-state value.

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  Seems like Chinese remainder theorem stuff but using types. I’m still seeking the perfect typeless language.
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  You too! I’m currently reading, about how to make sure software runs 500 or 2000 years from now
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