What you said would fit well in an American textbook. It’s basically what i learned as a kid in the 80s. As for its veracity? Eh, I still study it now and again but it’s really a nationalistic history rather than a historical or a scientific one.

What you said would fit well in an American textbook. It’s basically what i learned as a kid in the 80s. As for its veracity? Eh, I still study it now and again but it’s really a nationalistic history rather than a historical or a scientific one.

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The Greek’s metaphorical equivalent to infinite, if I remember right, was around 10,000.

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Well, it’s what I learned in early 1980s New Jersey, USA.

We’d hear something like it around Columbus day.

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I also took two semesters of American History in college courses. Same narrative. My professor even said, “North American Indians were shiftless, lazy and unproductive and South American Indians were industrious, hard working civilization builders”. It’s part of the US narrative.

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Part of this narrative encourages this idea of “Progress-as-an-end-to-itself”.

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Ah here. It does have a name: “https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Idea_of_Progress

I subscribe somewhat to the criticism that renames it, “Myth of Progress”:

“The myth of progress states that civilization has moved, is moving, and will move in a desirable direction. Progress is inevitable… Philosophers, men of science and politicians have accepted the idea of the inevitability of progress.”

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With the myth of progress, there’s a kind of faith-based belief that the future is somehow pulling us towards it, and the way we describe the past shows this, as if today could have happened no other way.

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Our narratives _about_ the past are written in the present. With what lens do we view the past? Do we turn that lens around towards the future to evaluate it in a similar fashion?

Is is valid to do so?

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