What excited me about the study I’m looking at is the EXTREMELY short time intervals: 5ms, 10ms. The study you show, which is also a fantastic study, uses MUCH longer intervals: 850 ms and 1,500 ms

What excited me about the study I’m looking at is the EXTREMELY short time intervals: 5ms, 10ms.

The study you show, which is also a fantastic study, uses MUCH longer intervals: 850 ms and 1,500 ms

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This is fascinating! Compare the neurotrees of two authors from the study I showed and the study you showed:

I don’t see any overlap. Hence, different philosophical / methodology.

https://neurotree.org/beta/tree.php?pid=3019

https://neurotree.org/beta/tree.php?pid=8786

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In my own research, in the things I’m looking for in particular, I consider anything beyond n400 (about 400-420ms) to be “too long).

400ms is almost 1/2 a second, a tick of a tick-tock of a clock.

n400 is the point where grammatical systems “kick in” and you can form cohesive sentences in your mind to yourself and also be able to articulate choices.

But you can do a lot prior to n400, just not put it into words yet.

Look at any activity you do that’s fast. Gaming, playing a musical instrument, typing. You can be aware while doing these things what you’re doing prior to the n400. It feels like “flow” but it’s not automatic.

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If you do any online gaming and test lag you KNOW a 400ms lag time is HUGE and very noticable.

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