What are all of those images that pop up as I am waking up?” and I went backwards from there until I was satisfied understanding the systems involved.

I never got deep into the “REM state” of study so to speak tongue emoticon just yet – but I like to study things after I experience them and then go backwards for the explanations.

I studied lucid dreaming when I was like 13 years old. I spent a short time checking out New Age stuff (my grandmother was into Edgar Cayce and all that), and tried out a lot of the tricks they show you in those books.

So lucid dreaming isn’t difficult, OOBE isn’t difficult. Fun stuff. 

You can train yourself to remember dreams simply by telling yourself to the night before as you go to sleep. Keep paper and pen nearby or your phone charged up and you can start to capture bits and pieces of them.

The memories fade VERY VERY quickly but the more you capture what you remember, the better you get at it. It’s a speed game.

It’s hard because they WON’T make sense at first.

My CogPsych study of dreams start from “What are all of those images that pop up as I am waking up?” and I went backwards from there until I was satisfied understanding the systems involved.

A generic overview didn’t matter as much to me ; I needed to be able to relate it directly to my experience so that it “made sense” to me as it was happening as I was waking up.

This also helps in dream recall because I’m aware of the metaphorical manners of the mind and I expect dreams to seem strange.

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