well yes, assuming a purely utilitarian legal system. Even within that, there are many ways to measure utility. But utilitarianism gets really ridiculous really quickly anyhow. I’m a pragmatist which is similar to utilitarian, but utilitarian goes into absurd ideas — Peter Singer is who I have in mind for that. So yes, if insurance ran the court system, it would certainly get ridiculous quickly. I expect though if they were to try to incorporate a no-free will argument into the courts, it would start at the case-by-case level; which they kind of already do with the exceptions in place now. Revamping an entire system of modified English Common Law however, would likely prove to be insurmountable.

 well yes, assuming a purely utilitarian legal system. Even within that, there are many ways to measure utility. But utilitarianism gets really ridiculous really quickly anyhow. I’m a pragmatist which is similar to utilitarian, but utilitarian goes into absurd ideas — Peter Singer is who I have in mind for that.
So yes, if insurance ran the court system, it would certainly get ridiculous quickly.
I expect though if they were to try to incorporate a no-free will argument into the courts, it would start at the case-by-case level; which they kind of already do with the exceptions in place now.
Revamping an entire system of modified English Common Law however, would likely prove to be insurmountable.
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