Well, I think it’s important to know first what’s on record allowed first; because big corps and governments _do_ try to do things legally first, embedding their powers legitimately (such as that is) inside of various legal instruments. Lawyers are always first. Nobody wants a lawsuit and it’s always possible to find a lawyer for any occasion given enough $. So, establishing that there is _not_ an IETF / IAB (Internet Advisory Board) backdoor process – one that CISCO had requested (and likely others had too such as NSA) means there could be legal consequences for those that break whose rules. In theory. So that’s a positive.

Well, I think it’s important to know first what’s on record allowed first; because big corps and governments _do_ try to do things legally first, embedding their powers legitimately (such as that is) inside of various legal instruments.
Lawyers are always first. Nobody wants a lawsuit and it’s always possible to find a lawyer for any occasion given enough $.
So, establishing that there is _not_ an IETF / IAB (Internet Advisory Board) backdoor process – one that CISCO had requested (and likely others had too such as NSA) means there could be legal consequences for those that break whose rules. In theory. So that’s a positive.
[responsivevoice_button voice="US English Male"]

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


3 − one =

Leave a Reply