We raised boars a few times for meat. Two at a time, automatic watering thing and everything. But the cost to do it ourselves worked out to 99 cent/lb (we butchered ourselves, which was a bloody mess but kind of fun – my arm’s still sore thinking about cranking the meat grinder) and after 3/4 pairs of hogs to raise, slaughter and eat… I figured out it equated to the sale price of pork, so meh.

We raised boars a few times for meat. Two at a time, automatic watering thing and everything.

But the cost to do it ourselves worked out to 99 cent/lb (we butchered ourselves, which was a bloody mess but kind of fun – my arm’s still sore thinking about cranking the meat grinder) and after 3/4 pairs of hogs to raise, slaughter and eat… I figured out it equated to the sale price of pork, so meh.

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I wasn’t trying to make money. The difference between what I paid and what they did isn’t all that much.

Commercial hog production’s effectiveness depends on many factors and crush margin is what they have to work with to cover standard expenses.

It’s not all that profitable to raise hogs commercially as you can do it yourself for about the same price – and that’s EVEN THOUGH many have the benefit of raising the soy and corn themselves.

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Like walmart and grocery stores, they depend almost ENTIRELY on high volume movement and low markup.

Price gauging goes totally against the grain of real world business models and is absurd.

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Let’s say you’re “that guy who tried to sell the water for $10/bottle”. Disaster is over. It’s the day after. The week after. Next year.
 
How much business is anybody going to give that guy? They’re not. Small term gain for long term loss.
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