We lack good metaphors for some of the quantum effects. But I think that’s because we learn it too late, long after we learn that integers are math. Oh, no, then there’s fractions. Oh no, then there’s percentages. Oh no, then there’s decimals. Oh no, then if we’re lucky we get to learn that integers are the EXCEPTION and are actually odd compared to all the amazing spaces inbetween a 3.00000 and a 4.00000. Hence, we can get stuck, say, on spin. Ok, there’s no great metaphor for spin YET. But raise a generation or two that accepts spin as everyday knowledge and they’ll find the metaphors to teach future students with that we can’t.

We lack good metaphors for some of the quantum effects. But I think that’s because we learn it too late, long after we learn that integers are math. Oh, no, then there’s fractions. Oh no, then there’s percentages. Oh no, then there’s decimals. Oh no, then if we’re lucky we get to learn that integers are the EXCEPTION and are actually odd compared to all the amazing spaces inbetween a 3.00000 and a 4.00000.

Hence, we can get stuck, say, on spin. Ok, there’s no great metaphor for spin YET. But raise a generation or two that accepts spin as everyday knowledge and they’ll find the metaphors to teach future students with that we can’t.

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YES, that’s just the thing I mean. I can see Lorenz transformations in my head but can’t do the math nor describe it.

But if I was raised with this as simply a basic aspect of “how things are” from a young age, it would be far easier.

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This for example could form the BASIS of so many new metaphors in life. Relationships, expectations vs reality, etc – who knows But it’s taught so late and to so few, it becomes “tacked on” to a fixed grid that we learn everything else on.

The fixed grid should be the anomaly.

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For example, just a thought, Lorentz transformation can easily pair up with Deixis as both have a fixed point from which everything else moves around relative to.

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no no, no, I’m not. I’m talking about better pedagogical strategies from kindergarten on up.

I’m not just or even mostly talking about physics here but rather better ways to look at one’s own world.

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I’m not afraid to look like a fool, which helps.

Mostly what I’m on the ongoing quest for is better and better metaphors as I can’t stand a poor metaphor.

Example of a bad metaphor: Gravity is a heavy ball on a rubber sheet. Sounds great until you have to ask: is gravity what’s making gravity work like gravity? You see the sheet pulled down but it doesn’t really answer much of anything about mass or gravity in the process.

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It is, but isn’t gravity and mass itself an emergent property of spacetime?

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Putting the ball ON the SHEET – that’s the problem I have with it.

I believed it when I was 16. Did a nice 10 page paper on black holes and drew images that confused the teacher.

But once I played with fractals and learned bits of chaos theory, connectionism, etc at 18, along with getting online, I started gaining an ecological sense of it all, and started getting annoyed at awful metaphors that hold us back in comprehension.

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In 1990, I was going to go into theoretical physics, but the professor I wanted was on sabbatical so I did something else.

I’m glad in retrospect as I probably would’ve gotten stuck doing string theory through the 1990s.

No regrets on life directions as they went.

Still, I never did grasp math literacy. But fascination with theoretical stuff and pragmatic applications of such remains.

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Indeed. And our perception is shaped by our learning. The child is the father of the man. If we learned a fixed-ness of ‘things’ young, the actual flexibility of reality will come as a shock as the child’s learning father’s the man’s understanding.

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Oh they’re out there. There’s a number of working additions to various existing languages, both imperitive and functional programming.

But afaik, nothing native YET, perhaps as all we have is simulations.

I think several typed Lambda Calculus programming things are out there but I don’t think I’ve seen any untyped quantum lambda calculus YET, but that’s what I want to see too.

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Nonlinear flow of elastic polymers chaining in turbulence comes to mind as a partial metaphor for what I’m thinking of. But I’m not a QM guy nor a polymer guy nor a math guy.

Doesn’t capture all aspects. Lightening behavior captures the other aspect.

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Oh I’m just thinking of a plastics factory playing with an elastic polymer, sloshing it through a tube and trying to predict how they will chain together.

More I’m thinking of it, the more wrong it gets. But I’m amused by the thought.

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You’re already lightyears ahead of me. My thinking is that our attempts at lab control is akin to stressing delicate elastomers as metaphor for collapsing wave function (breaking the strands) vs unstressed state whose connections (states) are inscrutible but working..

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But as I’m thinking more on it, it really is a poor analogy for any aspect but our inability to track and detangle with current knowledge.

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