We could examine arguments or evidence for and against the idea that rules/tendencies are inherent or intrinsic to the universe rather than imposed from outside. For example, we could consider the role of symmetries and conservation laws, the possibility of deriving laws from more basic principles, or the lack of evidence for external creators/designers. This could help assess the viability of an immanent panentheistic view versus external or Platonic explanations. We could explore the relationship between rules/tendencies and the flow of time. For example, we could discuss whether certain laws imply an “arrow of time”, how entropy and emergence relate to time, whether time is fundamental or emergent, or the possibility of timeless yet changing dynamics. Understanding the connections between rules and time may reveal deeper insights into their nature and origins. We could examine proposals for how simple rules could generate complex patterns and behaviors over time. This could include mathematical or computational models of self-organization, evolution, and emergent phenomena. Exploring the power and limitations of these models could reveal more about how rule-governed dynamics may allow for persistence, change, and history in the universe. This could inform how we think about the ontological status of rules and tendencies. We could consider empirical examples that might shed light on these issues. This could include detailed case studies from physics, biology, technology, and other fields where rules or tendencies seem most clearly evident. Examining the evidence in specific complex systems could ground some of the more abstract discussions and point to promising avenues for resolving the tensions. Examples may highlight alternate perspectives or suggest new hypotheses.

We could examine arguments or evidence for and against the idea that rules/tendencies are inherent or intrinsic to the universe rather than imposed from outside. For example, we could consider the role of symmetries and conservation laws, the possibility of deriving laws from more basic principles, or the lack of evidence for external creators/designers. This could help assess the viability of an immanent panentheistic view versus external or Platonic explanations.
We could explore the relationship between rules/tendencies and the flow of time. For example, we could discuss whether certain laws imply an “arrow of time”, how entropy and emergence relate to time, whether time is fundamental or emergent, or the possibility of timeless yet changing dynamics. Understanding the connections between rules and time may reveal deeper insights into their nature and origins.
We could examine proposals for how simple rules could generate complex patterns and behaviors over time. This could include mathematical or computational models of self-organization, evolution, and emergent phenomena. Exploring the power and limitations of these models could reveal more about how rule-governed dynamics may allow for persistence, change, and history in the universe. This could inform how we think about the ontological status of rules and tendencies.
We could consider empirical examples that might shed light on these issues. This could include detailed case studies from physics, biology, technology, and other fields where rules or tendencies seem most clearly evident. Examining the evidence in specific complex systems could ground some of the more abstract discussions and point to promising avenues for resolving the tensions. Examples may highlight alternate perspectives or suggest new hypotheses.

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