want to know what I want to know but I don’t know what I want to know until I see what I want to know, so speed is the only way I can find it.

Thankfully, I have a very specific interest here, so I can skim through most (which I did) and focus on the part I want to hear more about (metaphors, mimesis and such), and even there, skim through ’til I find the parts within that are interesting.

I speed read books: it’s rare that I go start to finish. I scan through for the parts I want to know about and do a lot of chunking or whatever they call it. It’s my impatience: I want to know what I want to know but I don’t know what I want to know until I see what I want to know, so speed is the only way I can find it.

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” the labor of metaphor is always motivated. ” – oh I like this. Yeah, this is good meaty stuff. The author went from aristotle down through the ages, hitting upon all the great thinkers I’ve never read, but answering a lot of questions or ideas I’ve had.

Emanuele Tesauro (1655), long ago did an idea I had, in a very similar way to how I was thinking of doing it. It’s a relief to me because it’s been done by _somebody_. Feels lonely getting these ideas and not finding correspondence SOMEWHERE.

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“No algorithm exists for the metaphor, nor can a metaphor be produced by means of a computer’s precise instructions, no matter what the volume of organized information to be fed in. The success of a metaphor is a function of the sociocultu ral format of the interpreting subjects’ encyclopedia. In this perspective, metaphors are produced solely on the basis of a rich cultural framework, on the basis, that is, of a universe of content that is already organized into networks of interpretants, which decide (semiotically) the identities and differences of properties. ”

 

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