True although I usually take it to mean “giving 10% more than the usual maximum, going into the reserve/emergency supply” but yeah, one can’t literally do 110%

True although I usually take it to mean “giving 10% more than the usual maximum, going into the reserve/emergency supply” but yeah, one can’t literally do 110%

I forget when when literally meaning figuratively was made official but it’s been used that way as long as I can remember. It’s a great example of one of those kinds of words.

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The differences of meaning tone of voice makes is also fascinating. Also, there are people that, even beyond adolescence, use sarcasm almost exclusively. What makes that interesting to me, is that EVERYTHING that say means the opposite of what they say, literally turning everything literally figurative.

I try not to participate in it unless I *really* have to make a strong point to someone who otherwise won’t ‘hear it’. [learning to speak sarcasm is a useful skillset when dealing with those who speak it exclusively but because it forces me to say the opposite of what I mean i don’t like to use it for it completely ruins quoting people…]

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Speaking of gag me with a spoon “rad” has come back in small doses and I get an instant “oh-god-please-no” reaction. Hoping it doesn’t catch on at ALL. It needed to die.

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I liked the others. Homes, holmes, homie, etc. I like the Bro, Bruh, even Brah. But homeslice and adding “-meister” to the ends of words gets my ire.

“Hey look, it’s the Mark-meister!”

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Here comes the Markster! Yeah, I can see that working.
Let’s see some variations on the meister:
“Its Markie McMarkington!” “MarkieMan!” “Marco Mar Marking Markaroni!”

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Actually with your name, they don’t sound half bad at all.

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