Tough call on that. To answer, I’d have to know the level of power they have in a given situation to compare. Are people consistent in every situation in every role?

Tough call on that. To answer, I’d have to know the level of power they have in a given situation to compare.

Are people consistent in every situation in every role?

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What kind of person are you when you’re by yourself? If you compare an isolated woman and an isolated man in a lab environment, which one is better?

I don’t think there’s enough data in that environment.

So, now you set up situations.

A woman in a dominant role, let’s say, parent of a child. How objectively better is a woman as a parent than a man as a parent? How can you measure?

Let’s say she is a school teacher. How objectively better is the woman as a schoolteacher than a man as a school teacher? Is that measurable?

Let’s say she is the mayor of a town. How objectively better is the woman as a mayor than a man as a mayor? Can that be measured?

etc.

I don’t think there’s enough information in the OP to come to a definitive conclusion without drilling down into scenarios and then rolling up the data to form a somewhat objective answer.

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I think part of the issue is men’s training as boys. We’re trained to recognize only a few valid emotions.

The other emotions put in the “invalid emotion” box, probably around 3rd grade / 8 yrs old.

From that point on, they don’t get discussed. They don’t get names. They don’t get recognized as valid.

So when we feel those emotions, we can’t name them. Can’t describe them. There’s no well developed vocabulary or self-understanding attaching those feelings with names and descriptions. So, we turn to the few valid emotions available.

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