They’re fine as limited educational tools to draw limited conclusions in a limited field.

True but still. It’s something not to forget.
Look at thought experiments, commonly in use in education.
They’re fine as limited educational tools to draw limited conclusions in a limited field.

But then people like to broaden to make wide-ranging implications for reality.

And then you run into a problem: they’re thought experiments. Constructed. Precise. Fitting the criteria set aside in a closed universe situation that may or may not fit reality as it is.

In the case of this video, it’s _possible_. That’s what’s intriguing: It’s _possible_.

But it’s idealised. Fictionalized. We may know of situations that ‘seem similar’ but are they? Family scenarios in particular are often _very_ complicated things and while they may seem to fall under scripted lines much of the time, there’s often far more at play than simplified plays designed to prove specific points.

Anyway, it’s part of my overall rant against stereotyping in general. A useful tool can sometimes be taken too far and people base real life decisions on stereotyping guidelines. Some lead to people dying.

So, I go a little overboard sometimes tongue emoticon

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