They have *some* freedom of the press and freedom of assembly but often that’s only true when tested in court. Since kids can’t usually get lawyers for themselves, it’s not often tested except with the help of adult advocates. So when minors’ free speech and/or free assembly is violated, the abuse continues. internet is one of the best places for freedom of press and freedom of assembly.

They have *some* freedom of the press and freedom of assembly but often that’s only true when tested in court. Since kids can’t usually get lawyers for themselves, it’s not often tested except with the help of adult advocates. So when minors’ free speech and/or free assembly is violated, the abuse continues.

internet is one of the best places for freedom of press and freedom of assembly.

13 is a more internationally accepted age for a “soft” age of majority.

But kids that are 7-8 years old regularly sign up for things online themselves. I especially noticed this when Minecraft PC was in its heydey in 2011/2012 and then when Vine was around. Now with musical ly, it seems that over 1/3 the people on there are around 7-10 years old, although most seem to be 11-13.

I notice movements of subcultures online and when Generation Z starting coming online en masse, I’ve been keeping an eye on their effect on internet culture as a whole and it’s been fascinating to see the effects of generations on other generations.

[the effect of Millennials on GenZ and the effect of GenZ on Millennials has been really interesting, considering many GenZ’s youtube heroes are millennials and carry their generation’s idealism and polar opinions, which seems to be features GenZ doesn’t have as much… well, I could carry on about this but it’s straying off your topic.

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