They don’t care about how you can do in the BEGINNING of the job. They know you’re not just gonna “jump in and be perfect”.

Not at all. It’s built into the hiring system, the probational period. They don’t care about how you can do in the BEGINNING of the job. They know you’re not just gonna “jump in and be perfect”.

Why? Because YOU DON’T KNOW _how_ they’re going to need you to use that knowledge, how much of it you need to know.

“Do I know Java?” “Yes”.

I know the name of it. I know what it does. I know what’s unique about it. I know what I like and don’t like about it.

Can I write something in scratch with Java? No.

But I don’t know what they need.

It’s not lying to say “yes”. It may _feel like_ lying, but it’s not.

Now, if they asked, “Do you know the behaviors of Transnuclear mice with predefined T cell receptors?”

I have to say “No”.

But do I know Java? Yes.
Do I know enough for the job? No way to know even if I could write Java in my sleep.

So, liar? No. Knowledge is capabilities, not answering multiple choice questions… unless the job has a quiz. tongue emoticon

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Awesome :)  Yeah, I think it’s the only way to get into a good job with growth potential for yourself.

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Yes, I found giving some autobiographical stories of my background in similar areas to be extremely useful. I’m good at those, so I did well in that way.

I like the glass of water idea. I’ll be sure to add that to my mental list of interview tips when someone asks me “what to do”. I may not give perfect advice, but I try to boost confidence in those who lack it but are capable.

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