There’s beauty in imperfection. Found ancient fractal program I used in the late 80s/early 90s called FRACTINT. I remember spending a lot of time changing the parameters, making new fractals, zooming in, watching the colors come from the deepest calculable depths and exploding into life….and starting big and watching the colors go down into the depths of the fractals, to continue their lives, sight unseen by me, but I knew, mathematically, they _could_ still be there. Yet, as beautiful and perfect as it is, I enjoy when things get even more complicated than that. What’s the calculation for this? A video taken of a fractal that was moving around, frames removed, the imperfect 256 colors reduced to a standard 256, resulting in different colors altogether… and a transparency that suddenly asserts itself in a bright FLASH every loop. What’s that formula? That’s when things get interesting to me, for as perfect as our calculations may be, entering reality gets to be a little more complicated, and that intersection between perfected ideals (no matter how complicated) and actual complicated reality (no matter how simple) is an unending source of fascination to me.

There’s beauty in imperfection. Found ancient fractal program I used in the late 80s/early 90s called FRACTINT. I remember spending a lot of time changing the parameters, making new fractals, zooming in, watching the colors come from the deepest calculable depths and exploding into life….and starting big and watching the colors go down into the depths of the fractals, to continue their lives, sight unseen by me, but I knew, mathematically, they _could_ still be there. Yet, as beautiful and perfect as it is, I enjoy when things get even more complicated than that. What’s the calculation for this? A video taken of a fractal that was moving around, frames removed, the imperfect 256 colors reduced to a standard 256, resulting in different colors altogether… and a transparency that suddenly asserts itself in a bright FLASH every loop. What’s that formula? That’s when things get interesting to me, for as perfect as our calculations may be, entering reality gets to be a little more complicated, and that intersection between perfected ideals (no matter how complicated) and actual complicated reality (no matter how simple) is an unending source of fascination to me.ezgif.com-optimize(2)
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a) Fractals are an outgrowth of Chaos theory (or explained by)
b) Philosophy in this era is often characterized by logic, precision, clarity and yet…
c) wanted to talk about it more, and perhaps this post, which was inspired ultimately last night by:
i) the changing of the group name to Chaos
ii) a resulting discussion I had regarding the Chaos theory origin post on my profile
iii) inspired some research that brought me back 26 years ago to run DOSbox and download FRACTINT to then share a Fractal (Mandelbrot, no tweaking) to Vine, taken with shaking hand, converted to animated GIF, frame removals, compressing of colors, and the eventual result here, that some call “glitch art” but whether that’s appropriate or not (I don’t know), I find it works.

Cause and effect. Can you tell the causes from the effects you see below? The Inverse problem becomes solvable when you have more information about causes such as I provided. But if you did not have the causes, could you determine causes simply by the video itself?

These things are important in Philosophy.

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