The type of meditation you’ve described is akin to a combination of mindfulness meditation and visualization meditation. Mindfulness Meditation: This practice is all about being present and aware of our thoughts, feelings, and sensations without judgment. It’s about noticing things as they are right now. In your meditation, this aspect is reflected in the instructions to notice the vibrant colors, the particles of dirt, the layers beneath the paint, etc. Visualization Meditation: This practice involves creating a mental image of a certain scenario, object, or outcome. It is often used for stress relief, personal development, or as part of a mindfulness practice. In your meditation, visualization comes into play when you are asked to see the sawmill that created the boards, the forest from whence the tree came, the tree growing in fast motion, etc. This type of meditation encourages deep awareness of your surroundings, as well as the history and processes that resulted in what you see before you. It cultivates appreciation, curiosity, and understanding, and is indeed quite personal, reflecting a unique way of engaging with and interpreting the world. It can also be seen as a form of “contemplative meditation,” where deep, analytical thinking about an object or concept is encouraged.

The type of meditation you’ve described is akin to a combination of mindfulness meditation and visualization meditation.

Mindfulness Meditation: This practice is all about being present and aware of our thoughts, feelings, and sensations without judgment. It’s about noticing things as they are right now. In your meditation, this aspect is reflected in the instructions to notice the vibrant colors, the particles of dirt, the layers beneath the paint, etc.

Visualization Meditation: This practice involves creating a mental image of a certain scenario, object, or outcome. It is often used for stress relief, personal development, or as part of a mindfulness practice. In your meditation, visualization comes into play when you are asked to see the sawmill that created the boards, the forest from whence the tree came, the tree growing in fast motion, etc.

This type of meditation encourages deep awareness of your surroundings, as well as the history and processes that resulted in what you see before you. It cultivates appreciation, curiosity, and understanding, and is indeed quite personal, reflecting a unique way of engaging with and interpreting the world. It can also be seen as a form of “contemplative meditation,” where deep, analytical thinking about an object or concept is encouraged.

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