“The point here is not to say there are no differences between experts and novices or adults and children , but rather to uncover less obvious ontological effects. As evidenced by patterns in predicate usage and development, children sometimes as young as pre school and often in kindergarten demonstrate ontological commitments in their claims about which predicates span a given term (Keil 1989) . These ontological commitments imply that children are not solely focused on characteristic or surface features. Once again, in cases where child reasoning is different than adults, it is not their cognitive structure or strategies that are different; it is primarily their theoretical knowledge or lack thereof which drives these effects. “

“The point here is not to say there are no differences between experts and novices or adults and children , but rather to uncover less obvious ontological effects. As evidenced by patterns in predicate usage and development, children sometimes as young as pre school and often in kindergarten demonstrate ontological commitments in their claims about which predicates span a given term (Keil 1989) .

These ontological commitments imply that children are not solely focused on characteristic or surface features. Once again, in cases where child reasoning is different than adults,

it is not their cognitive structure or strategies that are different; it is primarily their theoretical knowledge or lack thereof which drives these effects. “

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