The notion of “fundamental uniqueness” suggests that identity stems from something basic or inherent to an entity, rather than just its attributes or characteristics. However, it is difficult to pinpoint a single domain that uniqueness is from. Rather, recognizing fundamental uniqueness may require considering factors from multiple domains, including:

The notion of “fundamental uniqueness” suggests that identity stems from something basic or inherent to an entity, rather than just its attributes or characteristics. However, it is difficult to pinpoint a single domain that uniqueness is from. Rather, recognizing fundamental uniqueness may require considering factors from multiple domains, including:

Physical/scientific: The specific material components or constitution of an entity. For objects, this could be materials, structure, processes of origin or creation. For living beings, it could include genetic or biological aspects.
Experiential: An entity’s particular experiences, history, and relationships. The interactions and events it has been part of that shape its existence. For beings, this includes diverse life events; for objects, this could include ownership, use, and context.
Cultural: The cultural contexts and meanings surrounding an entity. How it fits into systems of human meaning, values, and practices. The symbolic significance or representations associated with an entity. This influences and is influenced by the above domains.

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