The non-physics (pure mathematics) book that was recommended, “Quantum Invariants: A Study of Knots, 3-Manifolds, and Their Sets (Series on Knots and Everything)”, I looked up citations to find 2019 citations of it in order to find “State of the art” in this particular specialized field of pure mathematics. This can give you a taste of what’s happening at what I presume to be at the top level of this particular field of inquiry / creativity.

The non-physics (pure mathematics) book that was recommended, “Quantum Invariants: A Study of Knots, 3-Manifolds, and Their Sets (Series on Knots and Everything)”, I looked up citations to find 2019 citations of it in order to find “State of the art” in this particular specialized field of pure mathematics.

This can give you a taste of what’s happening at what I presume to be at the top level of this particular field of inquiry / creativity.

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My general research process upon finding something new to me (Quantum knot theory is new to me) is to find the furthest extents and for that I find a well referenced textbook and follow a chain of popular citations (most #) until I reach [current year].

That gives me a taste of “What the experts are doing”.

From that, I can scale back to my needs, which are usually much smaller ans simpler by comparison.

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I love sci-hub. (it’s a tw domain right now). This paragraph for example, is about “what’s standard” in this field.
 
Most paper show you “what’s standard” and THEN try to either explain “What’s new that we found” or “We can be rigorous where y’all are sloppy” or “Our notion overturns everything”.
 
That’s just the nature of academic papers.
 
So for me, unknowing of a field, knowing that this is standard would be a valid starting point to try to decipher, even if I ignore the rest of the paper.
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oijjj
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So I ask, “What’s a Coxeter group”?
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coxeter_group

“In mathematics, a Coxeter group, named after H. S. M. Coxeter, is an abstract group that admits a formal description in terms of reflections (or kaleidoscopic mirrors). Indeed, the finite Coxeter groups are precisely the finite Euclidean reflection groups;”

Funhouse math. Now that I can understand :)

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    06.05.2019
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