“The findings of greater attentional capture with greater changes in direction and speed support the notion that perceptual animacy captures attention, because greater changes in direction and speed are associated with stronger perceptions of animacy (Tremoulet & Feldman, 2000, 2006). As before, in a postexperiment interview, the subjects gave no indication that they were aware of the animate motion.” — It’s Alive!: Animate Motion Captures Visual Attention Across humans’ evolutionary history, detecting animate entities in the visual field (such as prey and predators) has been critical for survival. One of the defining features of animals is their motion—self-propelled and self-directed. Does such animate motion capture visual attention? To answer this question, we compared the time to detect targets involving objects that were moving predictably as a result of collisions (inanimate motion) with the time to detect targets involving objects that were moving unpredictably, having been in no such collisions (animate motion). Across six experiments, we consistently found that targets involving objects that underwent animate motion were responded to more quickly than targets involving objects that underwent inanimate motion. Moreover, these speeded responses appeared to be due to the perceived animacy of the objects, rather than due to their uniqueness in the display or involvement of a top-down strategy. We conclude that animate motion does indeed capture visual attention.

The findings of greater attentional capture with greater
changes in direction and speed support the notion that perceptual animacy captures attention, because greater changes in
direction and speed are associated with stronger perceptions of
animacy (Tremoulet & Feldman, 2000, 2006). As before, in a
postexperiment interview, the subjects gave no indication that
they were aware of the animate motion.”
It’s Alive!: Animate Motion Captures Visual Attention
 
Across humans’ evolutionary history, detecting animate entities in the visual field (such as prey and predators) has been critical for survival. One of the defining features of animals is their motion—self-propelled and self-directed. Does such animate motion capture visual attention? To answer this question, we compared the time to detect targets involving objects that were moving predictably as a result of collisions (inanimate motion) with the time to detect targets involving objects that were moving unpredictably, having been in no such collisions (animate motion). Across six experiments, we consistently found that targets involving objects that underwent animate motion were responded to more quickly than targets involving objects that underwent inanimate motion. Moreover, these speeded responses appeared to be due to the perceived animacy of the objects, rather than due to their uniqueness in the display or involvement of a top-down strategy. We conclude that animate motion does indeed capture visual attention.

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


7 × five =

Leave a Reply