“The Dynamics of Attending: How People Track Time-Varying Events” … Temporal relationships modulate as events unfold: Rates change, rhythms vary, and structures transform. This presents a puzzle. The puzzle is most evident in dynamic events in which a clear temporal structure is apparent, yet the temporal components are not fixed. This happens, for instance, when a song increases in tempo or when a moving basketball player relaxes the rate of a dribble. The puzzle is as follows: Observers appear to apprehend stable rhythmic structures in such events, even as the periodicities that compose these structures fluctuate greatly. Although this phenomenon is common, only recently has it received much attention, largely in studies of musical events. Typically, musical performers shape the structure of melodies and rhythms to their own ends, playing ahead of an implied beat, modulating tempo, adding expressive emphasis, and so on. Consequently, the acoustic patterns they produce exhibit great temporal flexibility (e.g., Gabrielsson, 1986; Palmer, 1989; Repp, 1992; Shaffer, 1981, 1982). Yet, listeners are readily able to identify the meter, recognize the rhythm, and follow the tempo, as well as perceive meaning in deviations from the implied structure (Epstein, 1995; Palmer, 1989). https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1999-10188-005

“The Dynamics of Attending: How People Track Time-Varying Events” …
 
Temporal relationships modulate as events unfold: Rates change, rhythms vary, and structures transform.
 
This presents a puzzle.
The puzzle is most evident in dynamic events in which a clear temporal structure is apparent, yet the temporal components are not fixed.
 
This happens, for instance, when a song increases in tempo or when a moving basketball player relaxes the rate of a dribble.
 
The puzzle is as follows: Observers appear to apprehend stable rhythmic structures in such events, even as the periodicities that compose these structures fluctuate greatly.
 
Although this phenomenon is common, only recently has it received much attention, largely in studies of musical events.
 
Typically, musical performers shape the structure of melodies and rhythms to their own ends, playing ahead of an implied beat, modulating tempo, adding expressive emphasis, and so on.
 
Consequently, the acoustic patterns they produce exhibit great temporal flexibility (e.g., Gabrielsson, 1986; Palmer, 1989; Repp, 1992; Shaffer, 1981, 1982).
 
Yet, listeners are readily able to identify the meter, recognize the rhythm, and follow the tempo, as well as perceive meaning in deviations from the implied structure (Epstein, 1995; Palmer, 1989).
 
 
https://psycnet.apa.org/record/1999-10188-005
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Yes. I’ve been trying to narrow down what it is that I’ve been circling around for years, some confusion I have. For example, music spontaneously composes in my head. I have control yet it also has machinery that will continue working if I allow it and don’t control it also. How is it that there are so many variations of music possible even within a short musical phrase?
 
That’s one of many things all circling around similar issues, similar time frames (most under 400ms once I conquered the 6s phonological loop about 6 years ago), and there’s a lot that confuses me. Now I’m starting to see part of it is because the stuff that interests me simply doesn’t have a whole lot of research done in the way that works with how I think.
 
But it’s getting there. If I get the right thing, I should be able to tie just about _all_ of it together, all these weird things that interest me should tie in somehow. So I’m hopeful.
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“A complex pattern of ex- pectancies results when several oscillators entrain both to the rhythm of the external event and with one another (Large, 1994). These ideas are further developed later. McAuley (1994, 1995) also used entrainable oscillators. He advanced the idea of a preferred oscillator period, along with period decay, to ex- plain tempo discrimination. His model offers a dynamic alter- native to the multiple look model. A characteristic tempo is expressed in an adaptive harmonic oscillator with a preferred period. As with the Large model, this model differs from memory coding models in that the oscillator adjusts to new rates, adapting its characteristic period in real time. “
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 My interests are the differences between discrete and continuous, what is our role being in the middle of ‘stuff happening around us’, how do I handle life coming at me and how do I know which decisions are the best to make given the limited amount of information I have at that time, how do I prioritize and know what’s best or good enough in a given situation, etc.
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 Ah for that I sit and play. I don’t know how to plan a piece. Never could. Improv.Most things I do are that way. I could never edit my schoolwork either. All my drafts and final reports were identical. I didn’t know how to edit.
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Bill Clinger 270 bpm in triplets. That’s my happiest speed on the piano. Right hand anyway. I love the arpeggios. Multiples of that usually work. 90 bpm is my speaking tempo.
 
I once did a spoken word ramble for 10 minutes. A 90 bpm drum track I found, which is 1/3 of 270 bpm, fit perfectly in the spots where I took a breath. The down beats happened when I wasn’t talking and my speaking was inbetween.
 
It sounds like it was preplanned but I did it backwards. Hypothesis confirmed enough for me.
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  It might be why I always felt a little “off” as I’m 90, 180, 270.60, 120, 180, 240, 270
90, 180, 270
Definite connections. Probably why I often feel out of sync and other times, I’m with it.
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 I’ve played many. Not all well. I used to do a challenge: give me an instrument and I’ll play it.I had a 7th grade band teacher that took advantage of that. Put me on almost every instrument (except drums and flute) I was always carrying home some big heavy thing.I went through a phase of buying random musical instruments from eBay, playing with them for a bit, then reselling.

Taught myself Cello. but it hurt my back. Accordian I got it in the mail from ebay, opened it out of the box and everybody stood around:

“KEN PLAY SOMETHING!”

Ok, my first time with it. Didn’t know how to hold it or move it but within a couple of minutes I figure how to push and pull it, and where to put the hands and I played a simple song with chords. [as they have the chord board on the side].

“Look, he just got it and he can already play it!”

SO yeah, always some music thing.

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 Can’t say I play any of it well but they all move air, so it’s just a matter of figuring out “how do they move air?” and then where the notes are.Some are awkward though. Guitar took me a while and I only ever got a handful of chords and melody ability.

But mainly keyboard type stuff. Piano I guess. I have a synthesizer I used to mess with somewhere, putting in patterns and stuff. Korg MS-2000 – old beast now but it was fun.

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“Dynamic Attending Theory”
My Main interest in it right now? “internal coupling between attending rhythms” ie – internal oscillators interplaying with each other.
 
NOW THAT I KNOW it’s called: “Dynamic Attending Theory”, it’s much easy to find stuff – including a whole book to what before was a fascinating little notion hiding in a paper I didn’t expect to see.
 
While I’m still reading two other things, going to find this online hopefully:
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Time Will Tell: A Theory of Dynamic Attending
Mari Riess Jones 2019
ABSTRACT
This book is about time and synchrony and the roles these constructs play in our everyday encounters with events in our world. It focuses on auditory events in music and speech with the aim of demonstrating the potential of concepts such as entrainment and resonance for explaining how we interact, in real time, with these events. The book is divided into two parts. Part I is devoted to introducing basic theoretical concepts such as entrainment and resonance as they apply to rhythmical properties of fast and slow environmental events. Part II applies these concepts to events in music and speech. An overarching theme holds that similar dynamic attending concepts underlie the way we attend to and perceive communicative time patterns in domains of music and speech.
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