That’s true but at the same time, the change has to come from within. Who am I to stand on my pedestal and say, “You have internalized adultism”. I’m just another grown up telling them what I think they should find important.

That’s true but at the same time, the change has to come from within. Who am I to stand on my pedestal and say, “You have internalized adultism”. I’m just another grown up telling them what I think they should find important.
  I mentioned that in one of my replies (not shown) but I get the sense that they’re worried about the troll factor more than anything. I know these guys would be responsible voters. They’re worried about the stupidity they see among fellow people their age.I did mention that I believe strongly that even the not-so-bright have a right to vote, but I’m trying not to be just another know-it-all adult so I didn’t push the point too hard.To me respecting their autonomous decisions is most important.
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 Of course. I’m just speaking for myself on this. My goal is to start conversations on things. Sometimes I’ll debate and sometimes I take a step back. If I feel like I got the ball rolling.My last comment was:”I’ll keep posting about #16tovote – and I believe even people that aren’t all that smart should have a right to vote too – but you guys are giving me another way to look at it that I’ll remember.”
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  I debate and criticize and did so there a bit as well.But to be honest, they genuinely caught me off guard.With the 1st response, I started launching into it and got silence on the other side. Suddenly it hit me: he said his piece and wasn’t backing down. That’s when I realized we had a genuine difference of opinion and it was time for me to shake hands on differences, which we did.
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  For the next two responders, I said this. But it was after this that I got that mindblowing response where I realized that oh yes, they ARE paying attention and using this time wisely.Change is happening now.
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  Oh I know and I agree. But here I drew this real quick:
Voting can cut through all of those levels but when you’re stuck at the center, voting seems very far off and untouchable.
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zvxcw
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  Mine neither. I felt relatively autonomous. My mother was supportive, I had mostly supportive teachers and had no problems with local police.I read Summerhill and two John Holt books at 14 and it fit my existing way of thinking well and convinced me to get out of public school which I did.

But we have a youth rights perspective. These guys don’t. Most of the kids I knew at school didn’t either and I see them now, being oppressive to their kids just as they felt oppressed. It’s a cycle.

Hopeless, feeling helpless. One common meme phrase said ironically is, “I want to die”. They don’t but it expresses a common nihilism, misanthropy and a cheerful despair.

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MAYBE I’ve been inundated with systemic thinking for a long time and I’m making excuses. I’ll concede that I could be wrong-thinking here, just as I did with them. I’m not political: I’m diplomatic, although I support change both revolutionary and “within the system”, both slow change and fast change.If you want to hash it out directly, help yourself. Here’s the post. My comment section is open.

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But if you do, I’d appreciate if you don’t mention I brought their conversation into this forum. There’s an assumption of “closed circle” and I’m not trying to doxx anybody.

It’s also not fair to them as participants as I brought their conversation here without asking first, even though “NYRA Youth Rights Discussion” is closed to public.

But there it is if you like.

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