That’s a good question. I was raised to see Thomas Edison as a local hero. I see Musk as a “kind of” Thomas Edison. Now in 3rd Grade, I looked up to Thomas Edison because that was drilled into me. He was local hero, made the light bulb just like Christopher Columbus, an Italian, discovered America and other such US History tales. But cracks in the veneer around middle school and I started seeing Industrialists (and politicians) from a different light, part showmen, part conmen, and even though they may end up doing some good things, they’re more the Wizard of Oz than Whiz Kids.

That’s a good question.
I was raised to see Thomas Edison as a local hero. I see Musk as a “kind of” Thomas Edison.
Now in 3rd Grade, I looked up to Thomas Edison because that was drilled into me. He was local hero, made the light bulb just like Christopher Columbus, an Italian, discovered America and other such US History tales.
But cracks in the veneer around middle school and I started seeing Industrialists (and politicians) from a different light, part showmen, part conmen, and even though they may end up doing some good things, they’re more the Wizard of Oz than Whiz Kids.
==
I grew up in a different world; I first got online at 17 years old.
My knowledge came from myself or from the library or TV shows – and I watched a lot of PBS, particularly British shows and science shows because that’s what I liked.
Looking at the timeline, I would have to say:
Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy
Monty Python’s Flying Circus
Doctor Who
Carl Sagan’s COSMOS
were a few examples of what made me skeptical of Industrialists, Corporations, Politicians, Religious Leaders, and putting them all in the same buckets as each other. Entirely interchangeable roles.
==
In any case, it was not all fiction. Carl Sagan, outside of CONTACT, was entirely non-fiction, as were most of the other science shows I watched.
And the fiction I enjoyed was stuff that made you think about the world you live in and much of it was hard science fiction (factual), not soft science fiction.
Generally was not much for fiction, then or now. I never even finished Lord of the Rings, which is as basic as it gets.
But one thing they all seemed to have in common was a skeptical outlook on people in powerful positions. Avoid or ask what’s the catch because there’s always a catch.
ALSO: There was a TV show called Fight Back! that I watched religiously every week.
This guy would show you different ways companies may be ripping you off and very specifically too.
He taught how to look for design flaws, how to read ad copy for scammy language, how to interpret public relations BS and interpret what corporate leaders are really saying in double talk, etc.
But mostly consumer products and outright scams
So ultimately?
My opinion of him is based on being:
A Shopper.
He’s trying to sell me something and so far, I’m not buying what he’s selling. My skeptical arms are together and he’s not proven his worth.
He doesn’t have to either but he’s given me no reason to see him as anything other than a salesman
 THEREFORE, when someone is extolling his virtues or telling me about what they think the salesman’s intentions (or Alex Jones ‘ intentions Alan Alldredge ) – I see them as volunteer salesmen for their companies.

For whatever reason, they’re trying to convince me to buy that product or at least “sleep on it, maybe it’ll make sense in the morning” or berate me for NOT being interested in the product or for being skeptical of the company or main corporate spokesperson

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