Thank you for bringing out that point about received pronunciation: I would not have spotted it myself.

In the USA (I’m in the USA), we don’t learn about things like received pronunciation and what that brings ‘to the table’. To our ears, received pronunciation sounds “British” and gives an air of, “Why, this person must understand what he’s talking about! Just listen to his authentic British voice.”

Thank you for bringing out that point about received pronunciation: I would not have spotted the irony myself.

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I’m what in the US they call an “Anglophile”. I’m 44 yrs old now but have enjoyed British export TV since I was 8 years old (starting with Doctor Who, the comedies of the time and Monty Python repeats).

I was aware of received pronunciation and how it’s “received” in the USA vs different parts of GB and yet, it’s not something I automatically think about unless it’s pointed out specifically. The only exception to this that’s automatic is an awareness that, in general, if someone in the USA hears, “the BBC voice”, most Americans generally assume it’s fact.

However, knowing what I know about the BBC, I no longer do.

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