Termination of parental rights and responsibility is usually issued by the state as a result of several factors. A voluntary termination of parental rights and responsibilities does take place in the case of adoption. But the concept of a “financial abortion” does not logically follow.

Termination of parental rights and responsibility is usually issued by the state as a result of several factors.

A voluntary termination of parental rights and responsibilities does take place in the case of adoption.

But the concept of a “financial abortion” does not logically follow.

In this “financial abortion” scenario, the child lives. In the abortion scenario, there is no child. The two are not equivalent.

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It’s broken in most countries too the little I’ve seen. I used to think well run orphanages might be a viable alternative but now I doubt they ever existed outside

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I’ve known a few foster parents so far in life. They were all good ones thankfully. I suspect most probably are, although there’s always exceptions. [maybe just a hope on my part].

The Parlmairi’s were a childless couple around the corner from me. They were old when I knew them as a kid – seemed old to me anyway – probably early 70s – and I was friends with two of their three foster kids.

Their foster kids got in normal trouble but nothing out of the ordinary for around there. The two I knew turned out fine.

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They weren’t well to-do. The wife didn’t work. The husband was retired from a blue collar job of some kind. They had an above ground pool, which everybody there had, and everything in the house looked old to me, like they’d bought it 30 years before and kept it.

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From what I remember, they started being foster parents when they were a young couple and found out they couldn’t have kids. They just kept being foster parents, probably for 40 years.

I think my friends were their last set of foster kids they had.

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hat’s a good question. I suspect they had a mortgage and paid it off for 30 years until they owned it. Once upon a time, people would spend all of their working lives in a mortgage situation and would only own their houses by the time they hit retirement age.

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It’s worse because companies no longer pretend to care about employees. Everybody’s temporary. It’s more honest now but it must have been nice to live in a time where companies had a “company family” idea and had responsibility for their employees. I never experienced it but I’d heard it once existed.

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I’m almost certain whatever company Mr. Palmieri worked for was like that. He knew as long as he kept his head down, didn’t complain, did what he was supposed to do, he’d get a paycheck that was reliable, and he could make monthly payments to the bank until his house was paid off when he retired.

It was actually a very short lived system in the USA: Maybe the 1950s-1970s at best. But it’s the “magic days” US conservatives talk about.

I don’t think the answer though is bigger, steadier companies either. I think that ship sailed a while back, where the big company would be the parent to the citizens and I doubt it was much of a good arrangement.

It was a ‘thing’ for its time.

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