“The proof, as Scholze and Stix describe it, involves viewing the volumes of the two sets as living inside two different copies of the real numbers, which are then represented as part of a circle of six different copies of the real numbers, together with mappings that explain how each copy relates to its neighbors along the circle. To keep track of how the volumes of sets relate to one another, it’s necessary to understand how volume measurements in one copy relate to measurements in the other copies, Stix said. “If you have an inequality of two things but the measuring stick is sort of shrunk by a factor which you don’t control, then you lose control over what the inequality actually means,” Stix said.” oof

“The proof, as Scholze
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Prince of Persia, 1989, was a mind-blowing game to me. The movements were unbelievably smooth and realistic. I knew it was based on SOMEBODY’s real moments. But I didn’t know it was his LITTLE BROTHER. He filmed his little brother doing parkour and frame by frame created Prince of Persia’s movements based off his little brother’s. There’s tons of film he took – this is just a small sample. I’m impressed. [yes, it’s rotoscoping but also I think this is the first use of it in a home video game]

Prince of Persia, 1989,
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