LITERALLY more internal WIRES!? So still on Retrosplenial Cortex, which seems key to ‘something’. A search for Retrosplenial Cortex ADHD got me: “Insula-Retrosplenial Cortex Overconnectivity Increases Internalizing via Reduced Insight in Autism” “Reduced Insight” – which is a silly phrase – means an inability to see one’s self as having a problem when others around you think you do. It’s a social issue (being out of step with common opinion). That said, defined positively? yeah, I can see what they mean. AND, prematurity results in neuronal overgrowth – overconnectivity – generally, because the neural development is sped up exponentially being out of the womb and having to deal with world-stuff instead of being in the womb developing at the normal slower pace swimming in fluid. [internalizing means keeping things to yourself. It can be a rich internal landscape or anxiety/depression/etc or some combination of things that’s generally invisible to outsiders] https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0006322318300635

LITERALLY more internal WIRES!?
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It’s common in every election for the losing side to cry foul and claim there was fraud. Investigations happen. They find a couple of bad votes. The losing side remains unhappy. But for the losing President to do this is astounding. But Trump is known for perpetuating bad rumors and holding onto them for years. Example: “Obama was not America but born in another country.”. That wasn’t his first time either. He’s done that in other things too. It’s just.. never has he gotten so many to believe him.

It’s common in every
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So, under the OCLC classification demo, “Reflection (Philosophy)” has four categories: http://classify.oclc.org/classify2/ClassifyDemo?search-subhead-txt=Reflection%20(Philosophy)&startRec=0 ONE: “Reflection (Philosophy)–Mathematical models” Mathematical? What book? “The Structure of human reflexion : the reflexional psychology of Vladimir Lefebvre”. Who is Vladimir Lefebrvre? Cyberneticist but not just any. His was THE THEORY that was used in negotiations between the Soviet Union and the West that led to the final end of the Soviet Union as it was in the 1980s. It was used by BOTH the US and USSR to prevent misunderstandings between two VERY different worldviews. And it worked. I don’t know how much it’s been used since. Loosely, it’s the Russian equivalent to “Game Theory” but it goes deeper than game theory does as it’s about self-awareness of one’s own perspective, a difficult task for anybody.

So, under the OCLC
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“By using polymorphism you can use virtual functions to get the same functionality and because a new case is a new class you don’t have to search your code for things that need to be checked it is all isolated for each class.” So each CASE is a new CLASS that’s isolated from the others. So there’s be a class of objects for one condition, another class for another condition, another class for another condition…. ahhh.. that makes them global things instead of local if/then/else situations…. ..and the polymorphism is an AND thing — did i just understand something from object oriented stuff?

“By using polymorphism you
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Song rumbling in the back of my head. What is it? I recognize the voice. It’s Tom Petty. A few minutes later… the tune becomes clear and I definitely know it. Then a vague set of rhymes that I knew was wrong/forgotten/misheard but Google’s good at this stuff… Google search for tom petty won’t get to fly might get to sing and it found it. I was close. Of all the songs to pop in my head.

Song rumbling in the
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I don’t remember where I got this: it was in my memories from a few years ago: but it shows a relationship between these various things and a chemical reactor. You can read it as all of these things describe what happens in a chemical reactor or you can read it as these things come from chemical reactions ultimately. None of these are “abstract theoretical mathematics”. Or is it? Allow me to share something about theoretical chemistry:

I don’t remember where
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From “Prepositions of Place” to “adpositions” and finally WHAT and WHERE pathways of the brain and where that idea came from. Wow, I really went the long way around. THERE IT IS. Had to go all the way to Google translating a Russian medical textbook with their version of the same theory before finding the same thing, famous paper, already here. https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals/behavioral-and-brain-sciences/article/what-and-where-in-spatial-language-and-spatial-cognition/BDF5A91F1657439CE0C6FDE7B199CF66 Fundamental to spatial knowledge in all species are the representations underlying object recognition, object search, and navigation through space. But what sets humans apart from other species is our ability to express spatial experience through language. This target article explores the language of objects and places, asking what geometric properties are preserved in the representations underlying object nouns and spatial prepositions in English. Evidence from these two aspects of language suggests there are significant differences in the geometric richness with which objects and places are encoded. When an object is named (i.e., with count nouns), detailed geometric properties – principally the object’s shape (axes, solid and hollow volumes, surfaces, and parts) – are represented. In contrast, when an object plays the role of either “figure” (located object) or “ground” (reference object) in a locational expression, only very coarse geometric object properties are represented, primarily the main axes. In addition, the spatial functions encoded by spatial prepositions tend to be nonmetric and relatively coarse, for example, “containment,” “contact,” “relative distance,” and “relative direction.” These properties are representative of other languages as well. The striking differences in the way language encodes objects versus places lead us to suggest two explanations: First, there is a tendency for languages to level out geometric detail from both object and place representations. Second, a nonlinguistic disparity between the representations of “what” and “where” underlies how language represents objects and places. The language of objects and places converges with and enriches our understanding of corresponding spatial representations.

From “Prepositions of Place”
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