Learning: documenting map here. Already had interest in play-as-formative; looked up error correction in the brain, unexpectedly found a graphic about egocentric vs allocentric in map forming in the mind, which was influenced by: Donald Winnicott who was a middle-of-the-road between traditional british psychoanalysis (freud) and a more radical: Ronald Fairbairn who they would not teach for many years because he was so anti-Freud. HOWEVER, he had some who did, one of whom was John Sutherland who had several students, one of which was JD Laing who had a radically different view of mental illness – that it can be sometimes positively transformative – like religious experience – and itself modify behavior in a more natural way. So now I have a road map of this mornings surprise research – and lines to draw from to find parallels and maybe link to things I’d already read long ago to see what schools of thought I already belong to and don’t realize it.

Learning: documenting map here.
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Thing is, I +don’t- understand most other people’s points of view. I don’t feel threatened _or_ amused if someone says, “as a member of [race/gender/nationality/etc], understanding me will escape you”, I’m like, ‘Ok, You’re probably right”. If my engagement with them was one of mocking or debate, my behavior would clearly indicate that they are, in fact, correct, and that I don’t.

Thing is, I +don’t-
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Oh hi! You say “premotor” instead of “PreSMA” – no wonder I couldn’t find you. Playing piano in the mind—an fMRI study on music imagery and performance in pianists Reading of musical notes and playing piano is a very complex motor task which requires years of practice. In addition to motor skills, rapid and effective visuomotor transformation as well as processing of the different components of music like pitch, rhythm and musical texture are involved. The aim of the present study was the investigation of the cortical network which mediates music performance compared to music imagery in 12 music academy students playing the right hand part of a Bartok piece using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In both conditions, fMRI activations of a bilateral frontoparietal network comprising the premotor areas, the precuneus and the medial part of Brodmann Area 40 were found. During music performance but not during imagery the contralateral primary motor cortex and posterior parietal cortex (PPC) bilaterally was active. This reflects the role of primary motor cortex for motor execution but not imagery and the higher visuomotor integration requirements during music performance compared to simulation. The notion that the same areas are involved in visuomotor transformation/motor planning and music processing emphasizes the multimodal properties of cortical areas involved in music and motor imagery in musicians. https://www.researchgate.net/publication/237526579_Research_report_Playing_piano_in_the_mind-an_fMRI_study_on_music_imagery_and_performance_in_pianists

Oh hi! You say
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Where I’m at right now (Pre-SMA – and I’ve been here before but I understand it a little better) started from trying to understand “WHERE DOES THE MUSIC IMPROVIZATION COME FROM?” and it seems to be “motor planning of the hands”. That makes sense; instruments usually are played with the hands. Now I seem to have found a three way split they use in neurobiological research: STOP CHANGE GO/NO-GO commands. CHANGE for example, would be the area where one would chose, say, chord inversions while in the middle of playing. These decisions are voluntary but they are also starting just prior to awareness; so it often feels surprising – like the “muse” taking over with music; but we have control over it too; it straddles what we call unconscious and conscious but it’s both, as I think conscious here would be “ability to tell yourself something about yourself”.

 Where I’m at right
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Where I’m at right now (Pre-SMA – and I’ve been here before but I understand it a little better) started from trying to understand “WHERE DOES THE MUSIC IMPROVIZATION COME FROM?” and it seems to be “motor planning of the hands”. That makes sense; instruments usually are played with the hands. Now I seem to have found a three way split they use in neurobiological research: STOP CHANGE GO/NO-GO commands. CHANGE for example, would be the area where one would chose, say, chord inversions while in the middle of playing. These decisions are voluntary but they are also starting just prior to awareness; so it often feels surprising – like the “muse” taking over with music; but we have control over it too; it straddles what we call unconscious and conscious but it’s both, as I think conscious here would be “ability to tell yourself something about yourself”.

 Where I’m at right
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Philosophical paper about intention that includes the research on Pre-SMA and STOP / CHANGE / GO-NO GO. Don’t know what it’ll say: reading now. Weighing in on decisions in the brain: neural representations of pre-awareness practical intention . Synthese, Robyn Repko Waller; (2021). Neuroscientists have located brain activity that prepares or encodes action plans before agents are aware of intending to act. On the basis of these fndings and broader agency research, activity in these regions has been proposed as the neural realizers of practical intention. My aim in this paper is to evaluate the case for taking these neural states to be neural representations of intention. I draw on work in philosophy of action on the role and nature of practical intentions to construct a framework of the functional profle of intentions ft for empirical investigation. With this framework, I turn to the broader empirical neuroscience literature on agency to assess these proposed neural representations of intention. I argue that while these neural states in some respects satisfy the functions of intention in planning agency prospective of action, their ft with the role of intention in action execution is not well supported. I close by ofering a sketch of which experimental task features could aid in the search for the neural realizer of intention in action.

Philosophical paper about intention
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