Not necessarily. I don’t know if racism or religiosity are involved or violent or irrational entitlement either. I don’t know which of those, if any. I didn’t specify, I don’t think. Maybe I did and didn’t notice. I look for tendencies and trends through generations, hoping for confirmations of my personality and few grossly different and if I see grossly different, is there an unturned rock in my personality I’m not seeing? There usually is. But in the “nature/nurture’ thing I’m definitely more of the nurture for _most_ things. That is, we’re trainable to a degree to exist in society, or trainable to serve for battle, or trainable for careers. But it won’t be 100%. Nor do I think that genetics is 100% either. Like you say, it’s complex, but I like to look for evidence where I can find it.

Not necessarily. I don’t
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The incorporation of Time as a fundamental part of the mathematics itself was I think one of the greatest revolutions in 20th century mathematics. [metamathematics I suppose]. It’s fascinating to me for it is algebraic (step-wise) but explicitly invokes time and in his case, the self or “Creating Subject”.

 The incorporation of Time
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Ooh, this should be good. I like converting things from one type to another: images to sound, waves to midi files, movies to flow fields, etc, and these involve moving windows and precisely this kind of thing. A mathematical theory of resources Many fields of science investigate states and processes as resources. Chemistry, thermodynamics, Shannon’s theory of communication channels, and the theory of quantum entanglement are prominent examples. Questions addressed by these theories include: Which resources can be converted into which others? At what rate can many copies of one resource be converted into many copies of another? Can a catalyst enable a conversion? How to quantify a resource? We propose a general mathematical definition of resource theory. We prove general theorems about how resource theories can be constructed from theories of processes with a subclass of processes that are freely implementable. These define the means by which costly states and processes can be interconverted. We outline how various existing resource theories fit into our framework, which is a first step in a project of identifying universal features and principles of resource theories. We develop a few general results concerning resource convertibility.

Ooh, this should be
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“What keeps things stable on earth?” I ask Google. Got good answers back. First was gravity. Holds the atmosphere and water right here pretty much. In that stability, there’s the cycle we got. —– The cycle begins with volcanoes spewing CO2 into the atmosphere, which helps keep the planet warm, thanks to the greenhouse effect. This warmth allows seawater to evaporate, forming clouds and rain. As the rain contains dissolved CO2 it is slightly acidic and so it reacts with surface rocks to dissolve carbon-containing minerals into the water. This mixture is then washed out to sea, where the minerals build up and eventually precipitate out to form new carbon-containing rocks on the seabed. Sooner or later, plate tectonics carries these rocks into a subduction zone, where CO2 is baked out of them by heat of the Earth’s interior and later returns to the atmosphere via volcanoes. This cycle turns out to be an extremely effective thermostat. When the planet is warm, rainfall increases, speeding the rate of atmospheric CO2 removal and cooling the planet. When it is cold, rainfall decreases, allowing volcanic gases to build up in the atmosphere, warming the planet. Venus and Mars probably had similar thermostats early on. Venus, though,

What keeps things
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