Surface tension is a barrier to wetness in water. Can a water drop have water on top? Then water can be made wet.

Surface tension is a barrier to wetness in water.

Can a water drop have water on top? Then water can be made wet.

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These words may suffer from being contextual and multifunctional

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So: if soap makes water wetter, going the other way, that which increases water tension instead of lowering it would make water less wet.

But the wetness of water only applies when it affects other materials.

It is a POTENTIAL property of water. Add soap to water to make water less wet. But water’s wetness DOESN’T MATTER until it contacts materials

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Is water wet? is a koan that had me stumped. I ran it through WordNet, wrote about “wetness”, “wetting” (soap makes water wetter by reducing surface tension), the experience of “being wet” – can water feel? until FINALLY I _think_ I got it. I think. Ugh.

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But, water as “wetting agent”? I like better still. Water isn’t wet. It makes other things wet. But where does the wet come from? It comes from what water does to the material. Other liquids can wet too. It’s “doing” not a having.

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