Studying phonological loop (which comes under MANY synonyms such as “buffer” that I need to list) can sometimes be frustrating as I’m studying it specifically as a MUSIC buffer in the working memory workspace, like a toy train that goes around a looping track and I can change cars or the track layout or I can jump in and ride it to get a first person POV, or change to a different train)… …but a lot of the research not only is surrounding SPEECH but much of it puts SPEECH on a huge PEDESTAL which THEN gets me to doubt my assumption that both speech AND complex sound uses the same pathways that we call the phonological loop. This study from 2020 confirms what I suspected and I can freely read the others knowing that music is also included, which will be particularly useful when studying online editing in the phonological loop, which I think is part of workspace theory and they call the loop something else.

Studying phonological loop (which comes under MANY synonyms such as “buffer” that I need to list) can sometimes be frustrating as I’m studying it specifically as a MUSIC buffer in the working memory workspace, like a toy train that goes around a looping track and I can change cars or the track layout or I can jump in and ride it to get a first person POV, or change to a different train)…
…but a lot of the research not only is surrounding SPEECH but much of it puts SPEECH on a huge PEDESTAL which THEN gets me to doubt my assumption that both speech AND complex sound uses the same pathways that we call the phonological loop.
This study from 2020 confirms what I suspected and I can freely read the others knowing that music is also included, which will be particularly useful when studying online editing in the phonological loop, which I think is part of workspace theory and they call the loop something else.
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Agreed. I’d been looking for SOMEBODY to make this comparison to confirm. While I fully expect music to ALSO activate other areas that are perhaps non-speech and non patterned complexity, I feel justified in resting music upon the back of acoustically complex non-speech sounds.
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You gave me a new phrase (new for me): “Residual sound memory”. Thank you .It allows me to find other interesting articles:
 
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2014.00181/full –
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“Auditory dominants have a strong tendency to “overcache” sound. Residual sound memory will drive errors.”

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