something. What’s a something? Well, what’s a “thing”? Etymology matter because this -ism originates NOT in English speaking but Dutch. “From Middle English thing, from Old English þing, from Proto-Germanic *þingą; compare West Frisian ding, Low German Ding, Dutch ding, German Ding, Swedish, Danish and Norwegian ting.” The word originally meant “assembly”, then came to mean a specific issue discussed at such an assembly, and ultimately came to mean most broadly “an object”. So, you want an entity because English has it narrowed to that. But I strongly strongly suspect the usage of “assembly” has remained in Dutch.:

something. What’s a something?

Well, what’s a “thing”? Etymology matter because this -ism originates NOT in English speaking but Dutch.

“From Middle English thing, from Old English þing, from Proto-Germanic *þingą; compare West Frisian ding, Low German Ding, Dutch ding, German Ding, Swedish, Danish and Norwegian ting.”

The word originally meant “assembly”, then came to mean a specific issue discussed at such an assembly, and ultimately came to mean most broadly “an object”.

So, you want an entity because English has it narrowed to that.

But I strongly strongly suspect the usage of “assembly” has remained in Dutch.:

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A “thing” is an issue up for discussion at an assembly.

In short, perfect for a faith in a something. Up for discussion.

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But if you insist on a singular, it’s “reality”. That’s the something-other.

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English does not have a direct word for iets but it’s a cognate for “aught” or “ought”. From that you can get a sense of the “positiveness” of the something (as in, “there must be something”) which is why it resists elimination.

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