So, its beyond an ally: by standing together as one, it’s a stance against ageism as a whole, across the lifespan.

I can only speak of my experience and not generalize but for me, my interest in the political side of youth rights took a back seat to other issues by my mid-late 20s. I let other issues grow as more important to me at the time.

They felt like they were no longer my issues.

But somewhere in my late 30s and moreso now in my 40s, I gained a new perspective: youth rights ARE my rights, irrespective of when I happened to be born. Here’s why:

I realized that by abandoning a cause simply because I ‘aged out” of it (in my mind), I was participating in ageism in the worst way.

I allowed ageism to win over *me*.

I’m not letting that happen.

I realized “What people think” (social pressures) are what caused me to abandon it. I *believed* the ageist hype.

I’ll give an analogy – a poor one – but an analogy:

Let’s say I fight for the rights of men about to undergo sex change procedures.

One day, I have a sex change procedure.

Do I stop fighting for the rights of men about to undergo sex change procedures simply because I had one?

Do I stop fighting for youth rights causes because I aged out? It still applies to me because we’re connected as a human species. So, its beyond an ally: by standing together as one, it’s a stance against ageism as a whole, across the lifespan.

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