So, I’m a Hatfield, of the New Jersey Hatfields. But is it of the Hatfields & McCoys? Some genealogy has “George Abraham Hatfield, I”, born in 1716 in Lee County, Virginia as the child of “George Abraham Hatfield and Margaret H. Hatfield” of Elizabeth, NJ. But as both were born, lived and died in Elizabeth, NJ, the likelihood of being parents to a child born in Lee County, Virginia is pretty unlikely. I can understand the confusion – and maybe it’s true somehow – but it’s more likely he comes from another Hatfield immigrant and my family connection goes back much further than records currently show. Time traveling a few generations further back… One Hatfield immigrant I go back to is Mattias, “born in Holland, of Scots Irish descent,, and was a member of the New Haven Colony. Mathias first appeared in New Haven, CT in 1660 where he took the Oath of Fidelity. He subsequently moved to the area of the present day Elizabethtown, NJ in 1665, and took the same oath there.” Interesting. Scots-Irish but born in Holland in 1640? Looking at HIS dad: Thomas Hatfield, born March 04, 1602 Almondbury, West Yorkshire, England, He joined the group fleeing James I “Act Against Puritans” (John Robinson’s congregation) to Holland, where Mattias was born. Both of them and mom, Anna Cox, made it to America. Mom and Dad were buried in Holland Presbyterian Church Cemetery Holland Hunterdon County New Jersey, USA. And Mattias Hatfield? “Matthias bought the most pretentious house in Elizabethtown, NJ at the foot of Pearl Street and the Elizabeth River. This Hatfield house played an important part in the Colonial Wars, for under the trees in front of the house were held The Indian Councils and Treaties of Peace. December 5, 1673 Matthias Hatfield bought this stone house on Pearl Street at the corner of Hatfield, from Lubberson; it remained in the family for 241 years, until 1914. The property, from the stone house, extended to the Elizabeth River where he had tanneries. He gave land for the Presbyterian Church and burial ground (which is now the center of town. Alexander Hamilton used to walk there learning his lessons while attending school at Barbers.) Matthias was one of the leading men in town, was a wealthy man, and greatly respected. Matthias Hatfield sat in the Justices Court as a chosen Freeholder. He was also a Justice, a High Sheriff, and a Collector for the County. He also sat in the Justices Court as a chosen freeholder.” Not as exciting as Hatfields & McCoys but it’s something.

So, I’m a Hatfield, of the New Jersey Hatfields. But is it of the Hatfields & McCoys?

Some genealogy has “George Abraham Hatfield, I”, born in 1716 in Lee County, Virginia as the child of “George Abraham Hatfield and Margaret H. Hatfield” of Elizabeth, NJ.

But as both were born, lived and died in Elizabeth, NJ, the likelihood of being parents to a child born in Lee County, Virginia is pretty unlikely.

I can understand the confusion – and maybe it’s true somehow – but it’s more likely he comes from another Hatfield immigrant and my family connection goes back much further than records currently show.

Time traveling a few generations further back…
One Hatfield immigrant I go back to is Mattias,

“born in Holland, of Scots Irish descent,, and was a member of the New Haven Colony. Mathias first appeared in New Haven, CT in 1660 where he took the Oath of Fidelity. He subsequently moved to the area of the present day Elizabethtown, NJ in 1665, and took the same oath there.”

Interesting. Scots-Irish but born in Holland in 1640?

Looking at HIS dad:

Thomas Hatfield, born March 04, 1602
Almondbury, West Yorkshire, England, He joined the group fleeing James I “Act Against Puritans” (John Robinson’s congregation) to Holland, where Mattias was born.

Both of them and mom, Anna Cox, made it to America. Mom and Dad were buried in Holland Presbyterian Church Cemetery Holland Hunterdon County New Jersey, USA.

And Mattias Hatfield?

“Matthias bought the most pretentious house in Elizabethtown, NJ at the foot of Pearl Street and the Elizabeth River. This Hatfield house played an important part in the Colonial Wars, for under the trees in front of the house were held The Indian Councils and Treaties of Peace. December 5, 1673 Matthias Hatfield bought this stone house on Pearl Street at the corner of Hatfield, from Lubberson; it remained in the family for 241 years, until 1914. The property, from the stone house, extended to the Elizabeth River where he had tanneries. He gave land for the Presbyterian Church and burial ground (which is now the center of town. Alexander Hamilton used to walk there learning his lessons while attending school at Barbers.) Matthias was one of the leading men in town, was a wealthy man, and greatly respected. Matthias Hatfield sat in the Justices Court as a chosen Freeholder. He was also a Justice, a High Sheriff, and a Collector for the County. He also sat in the Justices Court as a chosen freeholder.”

Not as exciting as Hatfields & McCoys but it’s something.

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