Sample: “Wey aye, man! Divvent fret, wor gan doon toon the neet.”

Geordie (Newcastle, England):
Sample: “Wey aye, man! Divvent fret, wor gan doon toon the neet.”
Translation: “Yes, indeed! Don’t worry, we’re going downtown tonight.”

Yorkshire (Yorkshire, England):
Sample: “Ey up, lad. Tha’s got summat on thi neb.”
Translation: “Hello, young man. You have something on your nose.”

Brummie (Birmingham, England):
Sample: “Yow’m aroight, bab? Fancy a cuppa?”
Translation: “You’re alright, love? Would you like a cup of tea?”

Cockney (East London, England):
Sample: “Awright, me old China? Fancy a Ruby Murray at the Battle Cruiser?”
Translation: “Hello, my old friend? Would you like to have a curry at the pub?”

West Country (Southwest England):
Sample: “Oi, where’s thee be gwain, me lover?”
Translation: “Hey, where are you going, my dear?”

Hiberno-English (Ireland):
Sample: “Sure, I’m grand now. How’s about yourself?”
Translation: “I’m fine now. How are you?”

African American Vernacular English (AAVE):
Sample: “She be workin’ every day, but she ain’t tired.”
Translation: “She works every day, but she isn’t tired.”

[responsivevoice_button voice="US English Male"]

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