Pragmatically: A non-linear, systems perspective of life stages can inform the development of interventions and social programs across the lifespan. Given that, this is also true for the life cycle of products as well as the interactions between surfaces in compound objects. For example, a jelly jar has label which is died with colors from various sources, attached to paper which is attached to a jar with glue, the jar made of glass, then the jelly inside held in a vacuum with a cap that has a rubber ring inside and the cap is made of metal. All of these distinct parts have a period of time where they are useful as one unit. However, they each have stages of decay, just as they each had stages of manufacture, and will ‘die’ at different times, each death affecting the others (the death of the vacuum seal due to a failure of the rubber ring or an expansion of the metal cap can affect the lifespan of the jelly, etc.

Pragmatically: A non-linear, systems perspective of life stages can inform the development of interventions and social programs across the lifespan.
Given that, this is also true for the life cycle of products as well as the interactions between surfaces in compound objects. For example, a jelly jar has label which is died with colors from various sources, attached to paper which is attached to a jar with glue, the jar made of glass, then the jelly inside held in a vacuum with a cap that has a rubber ring inside and the cap is made of metal. All of these distinct parts have a period of time where they are useful as one unit. However, they each have stages of decay, just as they each had stages of manufacture, and will ‘die’ at different times, each death affecting the others (the death of the vacuum seal due to a failure of the rubber ring or an expansion of the metal cap can affect the lifespan of the jelly, etc.

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