One example of a system that places specifics up top and generalizations hidden within would be **tag-based systems**, like the ones you can find on certain websites, blogs, and in content management systems. In these systems, each post or piece of content is an individual, specific entity that is tagged with general categories. The categories aren’t immediately visible unless you click into the individual post or look specifically at the tag list. Another example is **news websites** and the concept of the “inverted pyramid” in journalism. They start with the most specific and newsworthy information – who, what, when, where, and why. The general background information or broader context is often given later in the article. Similarly, **databases** and **catalog systems** often function in this way. For example, a library catalog might list individual books (specifics) first. Only by clicking on a book’s title would you be able to see its broader categorizations (such as its Library of Congress Classification or Dewey Decimal System number, subject headings, and so on). In the world of software and application design, **Microinteractions** are a good example of this. Microinteractions are contained product moments that revolve around a single task, such as changing a setting, syncing data, etc. The specific task is what you see and interact with, but the general concept or functionality that the interaction belongs to is not immediately visible. Finally, in the physical world, think of **grocery stores**. You see rows upon rows of specific products. It’s only when you look at signs or navigate aisles that you see the generalizations or categories (e.g., “produce,” “dairy,” “baking needs”).

One example of a system that places specifics up top and generalizations hidden within would be **tag-based systems**, like the ones you can find on certain websites, blogs, and in content management systems. In these systems, each post or piece of content is an individual, specific entity that is tagged with general categories. The categories aren’t immediately visible unless you click into the individual post or look specifically at the tag list.

Another example is **news websites** and the concept of the “inverted pyramid” in journalism. They start with the most specific and newsworthy information – who, what, when, where, and why. The general background information or broader context is often given later in the article.

Similarly, **databases** and **catalog systems** often function in this way. For example, a library catalog might list individual books (specifics) first. Only by clicking on a book’s title would you be able to see its broader categorizations (such as its Library of Congress Classification or Dewey Decimal System number, subject headings, and so on).

In the world of software and application design, **Microinteractions** are a good example of this. Microinteractions are contained product moments that revolve around a single task, such as changing a setting, syncing data, etc. The specific task is what you see and interact with, but the general concept or functionality that the interaction belongs to is not immediately visible.

Finally, in the physical world, think of **grocery stores**. You see rows upon rows of specific products. It’s only when you look at signs or navigate aisles that you see the generalizations or categories (e.g., “produce,” “dairy,” “baking needs”).

Leave a comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *


+ 7 = thirteen

Leave a Reply