Ok. I’m going back to the 7th century BC, Ancient Greece, to the days where education was about the muses.

Ok. I’m going back to the 7th century BC, Ancient Greece, to the days where education was about the muses.
 
When the world was mousiké: on the origins of the relationship
between law and music – M. Paola Mittica
 
“This essay aims to reconstruct how the Ancient Greeks remember mousiké, the ways in which the relationship between mousiké and politics was idealized, and how it informed the lawmaking of the Archaic age.
 
Following an analysis of various passages in Hesiod and Homer, the author reconstructs the traditions of the Archaic lawgivers, focusing on a description of the works of Terpander, a mousikos who was active in Sparta in the seventh century BC”
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“the Greeks believed that mousiké was the vehicle of a beneficial divine force capable of holding together all the dimensions of existence – religion, creeds, power, authority, norms, knowledge, medicine, healing – and that, as such, it cut across all facets of community life, responding to the functional imperatives of survival.
 
This belief persisted for a long time – a period during which, in all lifeworlds permeated by mousiké, we assume that any form of knowledge and wisdom (in which law is included) was transmitted through the art of the Muses practised by mousikoi. “
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